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Subclinical macro and microvascular disease is differently associated with depressive symptoms in men and women: Findings from the SABRE population-based study

Wang, J; Tillin, T; Hughes, AD; Richards, M; Sattar, N; Park, C; Chaturvedi, N; (2020) Subclinical macro and microvascular disease is differently associated with depressive symptoms in men and women: Findings from the SABRE population-based study. Atherosclerosis , 312 pp. 35-42. 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.09.005. Green open access

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Abstract

Background and aims: Mechanisms underlying the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression are unknown, and sex differences understudied. We investigated associations between a comprehensive set of measures of macro and microvascular disease and depressive symptoms in older men and women. / Methods: We performed cross-sectional analyses of the SABRE (Southall And Brent REvisited) population-based study. Participants (1396) attended clinic between 2008 and 2011 for assessment of subclinical macrovascular (carotid ultrasound, echocardiography, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging) and microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy) disease, and depression. / Results: Mean age of 1396 participants was 69.5 years, and 76.2% were male. The median (interquartile range) of depression score was 1 [0, 2] for men and 1 [0, 3] for women. All measures of subclinical macro and microvascular disease were adversely associated with depressive symptoms, even when known CVD was excluded. Physical activity partly explained some of these relationships. The association between left atrial dimension index (LADI), a measure of chronic elevated left ventricular filling pressure, and depressive symptoms was stronger in women (regression coefficient 0.23 [95% CI 0.11, 0.35]) than men (0.07 [-0.01, 0.15]), p for interaction 0.06, on multivariable adjustment. / Conclusions: Subclinical macro and microvascular disease is associated with depressive symptoms, even in the absence of established CVD. These were in part accounted for by physical activity. We observed stronger association between LADI and depressive symptoms in women than in men. The beneficial role of physical activity in abrogating the association between subclinical CVD and depression warrants further investigation.

Type: Article
Title: Subclinical macro and microvascular disease is differently associated with depressive symptoms in men and women: Findings from the SABRE population-based study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.09.005
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2020.09....
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Vascular diseases, Depression, Risk factors, Sex differences, Epidemiology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10110555
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