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Sex differences in memory clinic patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment

Exalto, LG; Boomsma, JMF; Babapour Mofrad, R; Barkhof, F; Groeneveld, ON; Heinen, R; Kuijf, HJ; ... TRACE‐VCI study group; + view all (2020) Sex differences in memory clinic patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring , 12 (1) , Article e12090. 10.1002/dad2.12090. Green open access

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Abstract

Introduction: We aimed to establish sex differences in vascular brain damage of memory clinic patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Methods: A total of 860 memory clinic patients (aged 67.7 ± 8.5; 46% female) with cognitive complaints and vascular brain damage (ie, possible VCI) from the prospective TRACE-VCI (Utrecht-Amsterdam Clinical Features and Prognosis in Vascular Cognitive Impairment) cohort study with 2-year follow-up were included. Age-adjusted female-to-male differences were calculated with general linear models, for demographic variables, vascular risk factors, clinical diagnosis, cognitive performance, and brain magnetic resonance imaging markers. Results: We found no difference in age nor distribution of clinical diagnoses between females and males. Females performed worse on the MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination) and CAMCOG (Cognitive and Self-Contained Part of the Cambridge Examination for Mental Disorders of the Elderly). Females had a larger white matter hyperintensity volume, while males more often showed (lacunar) infarcts. There was no difference in microbleed prevalence. Males had smaller normalized total brain and gray matter volumes. During follow-up, occurrence of cognitive decline and institutionalization was comparable, but mortality was higher in males. Discussion: Our results suggest that susceptibility and underlying etiology of VCI might differ by sex. Males seem to have more large vessel brain damage compared to females that have more small vessel brain damage.

Type: Article
Title: Sex differences in memory clinic patients with possible vascular cognitive impairment
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/dad2.12090
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dad2.12090
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 The Authors. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Alzheimer's Association This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: CAMCOG, MMSE, infarcts, microbleeds, mortality, sex differences, vascular cognitive impairment, white matter hyperinensities
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10110469
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