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Does requiring trauma exposure affect rates of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD? Implications for DSM-5

Hyland, P; Karatzias, T; Shevlin, M; McElroy, E; Ben-Ezra, M; Cloitre, M; Brewin, CR; (2020) Does requiring trauma exposure affect rates of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD? Implications for DSM-5. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy 10.1037/tra0000908. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: There is little evidence that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is more likely to follow traumatic events defined by Criterion A than non-Criterion A stressors. Criterion A events might have greater predictive validity for International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-11 PTSD, which is a condition more narrowly defined by core features. We evaluated the impact of using Criterion A, an expanded trauma definition in line with ICD-11 guidelines, and no exposure criterion on rates of ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD (CPTSD). We also assessed whether 5 psychologically threatening events included in the expanded definition were as strongly associated with PTSD and CPTSD as standard Criterion A events. METHOD: A nationally representative sample from Ireland (N = 1,020) completed self-report measures. RESULTS: Most participants were trauma-exposed based on Criterion A (82%) and the expanded (88%) criterion. When no exposure criterion was used, 13.7% met diagnostic requirements for PTSD or CPTSD, 13.2% when the expanded criterion was used, and 13.2% when Criterion A was used. The 5 psychologically threatening events were as strongly associated with PTSD and CPTSD as the Criterion A events. In a multivariate analysis, only the psychologically threatening events were significantly associated with PTSD (stalking) and CPTSD (bullying, emotional abuse, and neglect). CONCLUSIONS: Certain non-Criterion A events involving extreme fear and horror should be considered traumatic. The ICD-11 approach of providing clinical guidance rather than a formal definition offers a viable solution to some of the problems associated with the current and previous attempts to define traumatic exposure. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

Type: Article
Title: Does requiring trauma exposure affect rates of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD? Implications for DSM-5
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1037/tra0000908
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/tra0000908
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10110344
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