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Cardiovascular Health and Stroke in Older British Men: Prospective Findings From the British Regional Heart Study

Ahmed, A; Pinto Pereira, SM; Lennon, L; Papacosta, O; Whincup, P; Wannamethee, G; (2020) Cardiovascular Health and Stroke in Older British Men: Prospective Findings From the British Regional Heart Study. Stroke 10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.030546. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Research exploring the utility of cardiovascular health (CVH) and its Life's Simple 7 (LS7) components (body mass index, blood pressure [BP], glucose, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, and diet) for prevention of stroke in older adults is limited. In the British Regional Heart Study, we explored (1) prospective associations of LS7 metrics and composite CVH scores with, and their impact on, stroke in middle and older age; and (2) if change in CVH was associated with subsequent stroke. METHODS: Men without cardiovascular disease were followed from baseline recruitment (1978-1980), and again from re-examination 20 years later, for stroke over a median period of 20 years and 16 years, respectively. LS7 were measured at each time point except baseline diet. Cox models estimated hazard ratios (95% CI) of stroke for (1) ideal and intermediate versus poor levels of LS7; (2) composite CVH scores; and (3) 4 CVH trajectory groups (low-low, low-high, high-low, high-high) derived by dichotomising CVH scores from each time point across the median value. Population attributable fractions measured impact of LS7. RESULTS: At baseline (n=7274, mean age 50 years), healthier levels of BP, physical activity, and smoking were associated with reduced stroke risk. At 20-year follow-up (n=3798, mean age 69 years) only BP displayed an association. Hazard ratios for intermediate and ideal (versus poor) levels of BP 0.65 (0.52-0.81) and 0.40 (0.24-0.65) at baseline; and 0.84 (0.67-1.05) and 0.57 (0.36-0.90) at 20-year follow-up. With reference to low-low trajectory, the low-high trajectory was associated with 40% reduced risk, hazard ratio 0.60 (0.44-0.83). Associations of CVH scores weakened, and population attributable fractions of LS7 reduced, from middle to old age; population attributable fraction of nonideal BP from 53% to 39%. CONCLUSIONS: Except for BP, CVH is weakly associated with stroke at older ages. Prevention strategies for older adults should prioritize BP control but also enhance focus beyond traditional risk factors.

Type: Article
Title: Cardiovascular Health and Stroke in Older British Men: Prospective Findings From the British Regional Heart Study
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.030546
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.030546
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Stroke is published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes.
Keywords: blood pressure, cardiovascular health, cholesterol, life's simple 7, middle age, older age, prevention, stroke
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10110069
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