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Infant feeding knowledge and practice vary by maternal HIV status: a nested cohort study in rural South Africa

Yapa, HM; Drayne, R; Klein, N; De Neve, J-W; Petoumenos, K; Jiamsakul, A; Herbst, C; ... Bärnighausen, T; + view all (2020) Infant feeding knowledge and practice vary by maternal HIV status: a nested cohort study in rural South Africa. International Breastfeeding Journal , 15 (1) , Article 77. 10.1186/s13006-020-00317-5. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: We investigate whether correct infant feeding knowledge and practice differ by maternal HIV status in an era of evolving clinical guidelines in rural South Africa. METHODS: This cohort study was nested within the MONARCH stepped-wedge cluster-randomised controlled trial ( www.clinicaltrials.gov : NCT02626351 ) which tested the impact of continuous quality improvement on antenatal care quality at seven primary care clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, from July 2015 to January 2017. Women aged ≥18 years at delivery were followed up to 6 weeks postpartum. Clinical data were sourced from routine medical records at delivery. Structured interviews at early postnatal visits and the 6-week postnatal immunisation visit provided data on infant feeding knowledge and feeding practices respectively. We measured the relationship between maternal HIV status and (i) correct infant feeding knowledge at the early postnatal visit; and (ii) infant feeding practice at 6 weeks, using Poisson and multinomial regression models, respectively. RESULTS: We analysed data from 1693 women with early postnatal and 471 with 6-week postnatal interviews. HIV prevalence was 47% (95% confidence interval [CI] 42, 52%). Women living with HIV were more knowledgeable than women not living with HIV on correct infant feeding recommendations (adjusted risk ratio, aRR, 1.08, p <  0.001). More women living with HIV (33%; 95% CI 26, 41%) were not breastfeeding than women not living with HIV (15%; 95% CI 11, 21%). However, among women who were currently breastfeeding their infants, fewer women living with HIV (5%; 95% CI 2, 9%) mixed fed their babies than women not living with HIV (21%; 95% CI 14, 32%). In adjusted analyses, women living with HIV were more likely to avoid breastfeeding (adjusted relative risk ratio, aRRR, 2.78, p <  0.001) and less likely to mixed feed (aRRR 0.22, p <  0.001) than women not living with HIV. CONCLUSIONS: Many mothers in rural South Africa still do not practice exclusive breastfeeding. Women living with HIV were more knowledgeable but had lower overall uptake of breastfeeding, compared with women not living with HIV. Women living with HIV were also more likely to practice exclusive breastfeeding over mixed feeding if currently breastfeeding. Improved approaches are needed to increase awareness of correct infant feeding and exclusive breastfeeding uptake.

Type: Article
Title: Infant feeding knowledge and practice vary by maternal HIV status: a nested cohort study in rural South Africa
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13006-020-00317-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13006-020-00317-5
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Clinical guidelines, Exclusive breastfeeding, HIV/AIDS, Healthcare quality, Primary care, Resource poor
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Infection and Immunity
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10109517
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