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Can mindfulness-based interventions benefit people with dementia? Drawing on the evidence from a systematic review in populations with cognitive impairments

Chan, J; Leung, DKY; Walton, H; Wong, GHY; Spector, A; (2020) Can mindfulness-based interventions benefit people with dementia? Drawing on the evidence from a systematic review in populations with cognitive impairments. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics , 20 (11) pp. 1143-1156. 10.1080/14737175.2020.1810571. Green open access

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Abstract

Introduction: Non-pharmacological interventions that promote quality of life in people with dementia are urgently needed. To accelerate development, evidence-based psychotherapies used in other populations can be considered. Mindfulness-based interventions with standardised protocols, namely mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), may be effective in people with dementia, although tailoring for cognitive impairment may be needed. Evidence from other cognitive disorders can inform research. / Areas covered: The authors reviewed 12 studies of MBCT or MBSR conducted in people with cognitive impairments, including ten in stroke, traumatic brain injury, and mild cognitive impairment; and two in dementia. Protocol modifications, outcomes, and evidence quality were analysed. Common themes to address cognitive difficulties included: shortened session duration, use of memory aids, increase in repetition, simplified language, and omitted retreat sessions. / Expert opinion: MBCT and MBSR can be applied without drastic modifications in people with cognitive impairment. Their effectiveness in people with dementia remains unknown: empirical studies using/adapting evidence based MBCT/MBSR protocols in this population is seriously lacking. Studies used a diverse range of outcome measures, which made direct comparison difficult. Further research with high methodological quality, sufficient power and longer follow-up are urgently needed. Development of manuals would enhance the replicability of future studies.

Type: Article
Title: Can mindfulness-based interventions benefit people with dementia? Drawing on the evidence from a systematic review in populations with cognitive impairments
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/14737175.2020.1810571
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737175.2020.1810571
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: dementia, mild cognitive impairment, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, intervention modification
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10109057
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