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Electrochemical carbon fiber-based technique for simultaneous recordings of brain tissue PO2, pH, and extracellular field potentials

Hosford, PS; Wells, JA; Christie, IN; Lythgoe, MF; Millar, J; Gourine, AV; (2019) Electrochemical carbon fiber-based technique for simultaneous recordings of brain tissue PO2, pH, and extracellular field potentials. Biosensors and Bioelectronics: X , 3 , Article 100034. 10.1016/j.biosx.2020.100034. Green open access

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Abstract

A method for simultaneous electrochemical detection of brain tissue PO2 (PtO2) and pH changes together with neuronal activity using a modified form of fast cyclic voltammetry with carbon fiber electrodes is described. This technique has been developed for in vivo applications and recordings from discrete brain nuclei in experimental animals. The small size of the carbon fiber electrode (⌀7 μm, length <100 μm) ensures minimal disruption of the brain tissue and allows recordings from small brain areas. Sample rate (up to 4 Hz) is sufficient to resolve rapid changes in PtO2 and pH that follow changes in neuronal activity and metabolism. Rapid switching between current and voltage recordings allows combined electrochemical detection and monitoring of extracellular action potentials. For simultaneous electrochemical detection of PtO2 and pH, two consecutive trapezoidal voltage ramps are applied with double differential-subtraction of the background current. This enables changes in current caused by protons and oxygen to be detected separately with minimal interference between the two. The profile of PtO2 changes evoked by increases in local neuronal activity recorded using the described technique was very similar to that of blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses recorded using fMRI. This voltammetric technique can be combined with fMRI and brain vessel imaging to study the metabolic mechanisms underlying neurovascular coupling response with much greater spatial and temporal resolution than is currently possible.

Type: Article
Title: Electrochemical carbon fiber-based technique for simultaneous recordings of brain tissue PO2, pH, and extracellular field potentials
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.biosx.2020.100034
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biosx.2020.100034
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Carbon fiber electrode, Extracellular potential, Fast cyclic voltammetry, Neurovascular coupling, Tissue PO2, in vivo, pH
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10107493
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