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Migrant status and risk of compulsory admission at first diagnosis of psychotic disorder: a population-based cohort study in Sweden

Terhune, J; Dykxhoorn, J; Mackay, E; Hollander, A-C; Kirkbride, JB; Dalman, C; (2020) Migrant status and risk of compulsory admission at first diagnosis of psychotic disorder: a population-based cohort study in Sweden. Psychological Medicine 10.1017/S0033291720002068. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minority ethnic and migrant groups face an elevated risk of compulsory admission for mental illness. There are overlapping cultural, socio-demographic, and structural explanations for this risk that require further investigation. METHODS: By linking Swedish national register data, we established a cohort of persons first diagnosed with a psychotic disorder between 2001 and 2016. We used multilevel mixed-effects logistic modelling to investigate variation in compulsory admission at first diagnosis of psychosis across migrant and Swedish-born groups with individual and neighbourhood-level covariates. RESULTS: Our cohort included 12 000 individuals, with 1298 (10.8%) admitted compulsorily. In an unadjusted model, being a migrant [odds ratio (OR) 1.48; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-1.73] or child of a migrant (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.10-1.47) increased risk of compulsory admission. However after multivariable modelling, region-of-origin provided a better fit to the data than migrant status; excess risk of compulsory admission was elevated for individuals from sub-Saharan African (OR 1.94; 95% CI 1.51-2.49), Middle Eastern and North African (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.17-1.81), non-Nordic European (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.01-1.61), and mixed Swedish-Nordic backgrounds (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.03-1.72). Risk of compulsory admission was greater in more densely populated neighbourhoods [OR per standard deviation (s.d.) increase in the exposure: 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.18], an effect that appeared to be driven by own-region migrant density (OR per s.d. increase in exposure: 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.24). CONCLUSIONS: Inequalities in the risk of compulsory admission by migrant status, region-of-origin, urban living and own-region migrant density highlight discernible factors which raise barriers to equitable care and provide potential targets for intervention.

Type: Article
Title: Migrant status and risk of compulsory admission at first diagnosis of psychotic disorder: a population-based cohort study in Sweden
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291720002068
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291720002068
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Compulsory admission, involuntary commitment, migration, neighbourhood, pathways to care, psychiatric epidemiology, psychosis, psychotic disorder, social determinants of health
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105534
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