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Network reorganisation following anterior temporal lobe resection and relation with post-surgery seizure relapse: A longitudinal study

da Silva, NM; Forsyth, R; McEvoy, A; Miserocchi, A; de Tisi, J; Vos, SB; Winston, GP; ... Taylor, PN; + view all (2020) Network reorganisation following anterior temporal lobe resection and relation with post-surgery seizure relapse: A longitudinal study. NeuroImage: Clinical , 27 , Article 102320. 10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102320. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To characterise temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery-induced changes in brain network properties, as measured using diffusion weighted MRI, and investigate their association with postoperative seizure-freedom. METHODS: For 48 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobe resection, diffusion weighted MRI was acquired pre-operatively, 3-4 months post-operatively (N = 48), and again 12 months post-operatively (N = 13). Data for 17 controls were also acquired over the same period. After registering all subjects to a common space, we performed two complementary analyses of the subjects' quantitative anisotropy (QA) maps. 1) A connectometry analysis which is sensitive to changes in subsections of fasciculi. 2) A graph theory approach which integrates connectivity information across the wider brain network. RESULTS: We found significant postoperative alterations in QA in patients relative to controls measured over the same period. Reductions were primarily located in the uncinate fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus ipsilaterally for all patients. Larger reductions were associated with postoperative seizure-freedom in left TLE. Increased QA was mainly located in corona radiata and corticopontine tracts. Graph theoretic analysis revealed widespread increases in nodal betweenness centrality, which were not associated with patient outcomes. CONCLUSION: Substantial alterations in QA occur in the months after epilepsy surgery, suggesting Wallerian degeneration and strengthening of specific white matter tracts. Greater reductions in QA were related to postoperative seizure freedom in left TLE.

Type: Article
Title: Network reorganisation following anterior temporal lobe resection and relation with post-surgery seizure relapse: A longitudinal study
Location: Netherlands
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102320
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2020.102320
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Longitudinal study, Seizure-freedom, Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105523
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