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An optimized and highly repeatable MRI acquisition and processing pipeline for quantitative susceptibility mapping in the head-and-neck region

Karsa, A; Punwani, S; Shmueli, K; (2020) An optimized and highly repeatable MRI acquisition and processing pipeline for quantitative susceptibility mapping in the head-and-neck region. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 10.1002/mrm.28377. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM) is an emerging technique sensitive to disease-related changes including oxygenation. It is extensively used in brain studies and has increasing clinical applications outside the brain. Here we present the first MRI acquisition protocol and QSM pipeline optimized for the head-and-neck region together with a repeatability analysis performed in healthy volunteers. METHODS: We investigated both the intrasession and the intersession repeatability of the optimized method in 10 subjects. We also implemented two, Tikhonov-regularisation-based susceptibility calculation techniques that were found to have higher contrast-to-noise than existing methods in the head-and-neck region. Repeatability was evaluated by calculating the distributions of susceptibility differences between repeated scans and the corresponding minimum detectable effect sizes (MDEs). RESULTS: Deep brain regions had higher QSM repeatability than neck regions. As expected, intrasession repeatability was generally better than intersession repeatability. Susceptibility maps calculated using projection onto dipole fields for background field removal were more repeatable than using the Laplacian boundary value method in the head-and-neck region. Small (short-axis diameter <5 mm) lymph nodes had the lowest repeatability (MDE = 0.27 ppm) as imperfect segmentation included some of the surrounding paramagnetic fatty fascia, highlighting the importance of accurate region delineation. MDEs in the larger lymph nodes (0.16 ppm), submandibular glands (0.10 ppm), and especially the parotid glands (0.06 ppm) were much lower, comparable to those of the brain regions. CONCLUSIONS: The high repeatability of the acquisition and pipeline optimized for QSM will facilitate clinical studies in the head-and-neck region.

Type: Article
Title: An optimized and highly repeatable MRI acquisition and processing pipeline for quantitative susceptibility mapping in the head-and-neck region
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/mrm.28377
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.28377
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: QSM, head and neck, lymph node, parotid gland, repeatability, submandibular gland, susceptibility mapping
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105510
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