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Sarcoma and the 100,000 Genomes Project: our experience and changes to practice

Prendergast, SC; Strobl, A-C; Cross, W; Pillay, N; Strauss, SJ; Ye, H; Lindsay, D; ... Amary, F; + view all (2020) Sarcoma and the 100,000 Genomes Project: our experience and changes to practice. The Journal of Pathology: Clinical Research 10.1002/cjp2.174. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

The largest whole genome sequencing (WGS) endeavour involving cancer and rare diseases was initiated in the UK in 2015 and ran for 5 years. Despite its rarity, sarcoma ranked third overall among the number of patients' samples sent for sequencing. Herein, we recount the lessons learned by a specialist sarcoma centre that recruited close to 1000 patients to the project, so that we and others may learn from our experience. WGS data was generated from 597 patients, but samples from the remaining approximately 400 patients were not sequenced. This was largely accounted for by unsuitability due to extensive necrosis, secondary to neoadjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy, or being placed in formalin. The number of informative genomes produced was reduced further by a PCR amplification step. We showed that this loss of genomic data could be mitigated by sequencing whole genomes from needle core biopsies. Storage of resection specimens at 4 °C for up to 96 h overcame the challenge of freezing tissue out of hours including weekends. Removing access to formalin increased compliance to these storage arrangements. With over 70 different sarcoma subtypes described, WGS was a useful tool for refining diagnoses and identifying novel alterations. Genomes from 350 of the cohort of 597 patients were analysed in this study. Overall, diagnoses were modified for 3% of patients following review of the WGS findings. Continued refinement of the variant‐calling bioinformatic pipelines is required as not all alterations were identified when validated against histology and standard of care diagnostic tests. Further research is necessary to evaluate the impact of germline mutations in patients with sarcoma, and sarcomas with evidence of hypermutation. Despite 50% of the WGS exhibiting domain 1 alterations, the number of patients with sarcoma who were eligible for clinical trials remains small, highlighting the need to revaluate clinical trial design.

Type: Article
Title: Sarcoma and the 100,000 Genomes Project: our experience and changes to practice
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/cjp2.174
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/cjp2.174
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Pathology, cancer, genetics, genome, sarcoma, JOINT-CONSENSUS-RECOMMENDATION, SEQUENCE VARIANTS, ASSOCIATION, GUIDELINES, SIGNATURES, STANDARDS, COLLEGE, FUSIONS, GENE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Pathology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105505
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