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Olfactory testing does not predict beta-amyloid, MRI measures of neurodegeneration or vascular pathology in the British 1946 birth cohort

Buchanan, SM; Parker, TD; Lane, CA; Keshavan, A; Keuss, SE; Lu, K; James, S-N; ... Schott, JM; + view all (2020) Olfactory testing does not predict beta-amyloid, MRI measures of neurodegeneration or vascular pathology in the British 1946 birth cohort. Journal of Neurology 10.1007/s00415-020-10004-4. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Objective: To explore the value of olfactory identification deficits as a predictor of cerebral β-amyloid status and other markers of brain health in cognitively normal adults aged ~ 70 years. Methods: Cross-sectional observational cohort study. 389 largely healthy and cognitively normal older adults were recruited from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (1946 British Birth cohort) and investigated for olfactory identification deficits, as measured by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. Outcome measures were imaging markers of brain health derived from 3 T MRI scanning (cortical thickness, entorhinal cortex thickness, white matter hyperintensity volumes); 18F florbetapir amyloid-PET scanning; and cognitive testing results. Participants were assessed at a single centre between March 2015 and January 2018. Results: Mean (± SD) age was 70.6 (± 0.7) years, 50.8% were female. 64.5% had hyposmia and 2.6% anosmia. Olfaction showed no association with β-amyloid status, hippocampal volume, entorhinal cortex thickness, AD signature cortical thickness, white matter hyperintensity volume, or cognition. Conclusion and relevance: In the early 70s, olfactory function is not a reliable predictor of a range of imaging and cognitive measures of preclinical AD. Olfactory identification deficits are not likely to be a useful means of identifying asymptomatic amyloidosis. Further studies are required to assess if change in olfaction may be a proximity marker for the development of cognitive impairment.

Type: Article
Title: Olfactory testing does not predict beta-amyloid, MRI measures of neurodegeneration or vascular pathology in the British 1946 birth cohort
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00415-020-10004-4
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-020-10004-4
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences & Neurology, Alzheimer's disease, Olfactory impairment, Neuroimaging, MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, ODOR IDENTIFICATION, ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE, BIOMARKERS, DEFICITS, DECLINE, MEMORY
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105504
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