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Bio-inspired multi-resonant acoustic devices based on electrospun piezoelectric polymeric nanofibres

Viola, G; Chang, J; Maltby, T; Steckler, F; Jomaa, M; Sun, J; Edusei, J; ... Song, W; + view all (2020) Bio-inspired multi-resonant acoustic devices based on electrospun piezoelectric polymeric nanofibres. ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces , 12 (31) pp. 34643-34657. 10.1021/acsami.0c09238. Green open access

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Abstract

Cochlear hair cells are critical for the conversion of acoustic into electrical signals and their dysfunction is a primary cause of acquired hearing impairments, which worsen with aging. Piezoelectric materials can reproduce the acoustic-electrical transduction properties of the cochlea and represent promising candidates for future cochlear prostheses. The majority of piezoelectric hearing devices so far developed are based on thin films, which have not managed to simultaneously provide the desired flexibility, high sensitivity, wide frequency selectivity, and biocompatibility. To overcome these issues, we hypothesized that fibrous membranes made up of polymeric piezoelectric biocompatible nanofibers could be employed to mimic the function of the basilar membrane, by selectively vibrating in response to different frequencies of sound and transmitting the resulting electrical impulses to the vestibulocochlear nerve. In this study, poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) piezoelectric nanofiber-based acoustic circular sensors were designed and fabricated using the electrospinning technique. The performance of the sensors was investigated with particular focus on the identification of the resonance frequencies and acoustic-electrical conversion in fibrous membrane with different size and fiber orientation. The voltage output (1–17 mV) varied in the range of low resonance frequency (100–400 Hz) depending on the diameter of the macroscale sensors and alignment of the fibers. The devices developed can be regarded as a proof-of-concept demonstrating the possibility of using piezoelectric fibers to convert acoustic waves into electrical signals, through possible synergistic effects of piezoelectricity and triboelectricity. The study has paved the way for the development of self-powered nanofibrous implantable auditory sensors.

Type: Article
Title: Bio-inspired multi-resonant acoustic devices based on electrospun piezoelectric polymeric nanofibres
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1021/acsami.0c09238
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.0c09238
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article published under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the author and source are cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10105437
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