UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Suicide Reporting Within British Newspapers' Arts Coverage Content Analysis of Adherence to Media Guidelines

Pitman, A; Stevenson, F; (2015) Suicide Reporting Within British Newspapers' Arts Coverage Content Analysis of Adherence to Media Guidelines. Crisis - The Journal of Crisis Intervention and Suicide Prevention , 36 (1) pp. 13-20. 10.1027/0227-5910/a000294. Green open access

[thumbnail of Pitman_Suicide reporting in British newspapers - manuscript 2013 10 31.pdf]
Preview
Text
Pitman_Suicide reporting in British newspapers - manuscript 2013 10 31.pdf

Download (207kB) | Preview
[thumbnail of Pitman_Suicide reporting in British newspapers - Boxes and Tables 2013 10 09.pdf]
Preview
Text
Pitman_Suicide reporting in British newspapers - Boxes and Tables 2013 10 09.pdf

Download (307kB) | Preview

Abstract

Background: Many suicide prevention strategies promote media guidelines on suicide reporting, given evidence that irresponsible reporting of suicide can influence imitative suicidal behavior. Due to limited resources, monitoring of guideline adherence has tended to focus on news outputs, with a risk of neglecting other journalistic content. Aims: To determine whether British newspapers’ arts coverage adheres to media guidelines on suicide reporting. Method: Purposive sampling was used to capture current national practice on suicide reporting within newspapers’ arts coverage of exhibitions. Recent major UK exhibitions by artists who had died by suicide were identified: Kirchner, Rothko, Gorky, and Van Gogh. Content analysis of all UK national newspaper coverage of these exhibitions was performed to measure the articles’ adherence to widely accepted media guidelines. Results: In all, 68 newspaper reviews satisfied inclusion criteria, with 100% failing to show full adherence to media guidelines: 21% used inappropriate language; 38% provided explicit descriptions of the suicide; 7% employed simplistic explanations for suicide triggers; 27% romanticized the suicide; and 100% omitted information on sources of support. Conclusion: British newspapers’ arts coverage of exhibitions deviates considerably from media guidelines on the reporting of suicide. The findings suggest scope to improve journalists’ awareness of the importance of this component of suicide prevention strategies.

Type: Article
Title: Suicide Reporting Within British Newspapers' Arts Coverage Content Analysis of Adherence to Media Guidelines
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1027/0227-5910/a000294
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1027/0227-5910/a000294
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: suicide reporting, media guidelines, suicide prevention, content analysis, imitative behavior
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10104842
Downloads since deposit
44Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item