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Age-related patterns of early childhood development practices amongst rural families in Burkina Faso: findings from a nationwide survey of mothers of children aged 0-3 years

Hollowell, J; Belem, M; Swigart, T; Murray, J; Hill, Z; (2020) Age-related patterns of early childhood development practices amongst rural families in Burkina Faso: findings from a nationwide survey of mothers of children aged 0-3 years. Global Health Action , 13 (1) , Article 1772560. 10.1080/16549716.2020.1772560. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Around two thirds of children in Sub-Saharan Africa are at risk of not meeting their developmental potential. Scalable interventions, based on an understanding of local contexts, that promote nurturing care in children's early years are needed. OBJECTIVES: To investigate age-related patterns of Early Childhood Development (ECD) practices amongst caretakers of children aged 0-3 years in rural households in Burkina Faso, in order to inform the design of a mass media campaign to be evaluated through a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A household survey using a structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 960 rural mothers of children aged 0-3 years in a regionally stratified random sample of 130 villages. RESULTS: The mother was the main caretaker and engaged most in ECD-related activities at all ages (0-3 years). The father, grandmother and older children also engaged in ECD-related activities with older children (aged 1-3 years). Singing and playing occurred moderately frequently. Singing in the last three days: 36% at age 0-5 months increasing to 84% at age 3 years; playing in the last three days: 26% at age 0-5 months, increasing to 65% at age 3 years. Activities such as reading, counting, drawing, 'showing and naming' and 'chatting' were limited, particularly in the child's first year. Reasons for not engaging in these activities include lack of literacy, lack of books and toys or playthings and a belief that the child was too young. CONCLUSION: Opportunities for learning, especially through verbal interactions, appeared to be limited during the developmentally crucial first three years, most notably in the first year of life. The challenge for ECD intervention development in Burkina Faso will be finding ways to promote more responsive interactions at an early age and finding ways of mobilizing other family members to become more engaged in stimulating activities in the child's early years.

Type: Article
Title: Age-related patterns of early childhood development practices amongst rural families in Burkina Faso: findings from a nationwide survey of mothers of children aged 0-3 years
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/16549716.2020.1772560
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/16549716.2020.1772560
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Burkina Faso, early childhood development, parenting, rural population, survey research
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10104821
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