UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

"Falling through the cracks"; Stakeholders' views around the concept and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and their understanding of dementia prevention

Poppe, M; Mansour, H; Rapaport, P; Palomo, M; Burton, A; Morgan-Trimmer, S; Carter, C; ... Cooper, C; + view all (2020) "Falling through the cracks"; Stakeholders' views around the concept and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and their understanding of dementia prevention. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry , 35 (11) pp. 1349-1357. 10.1002/gps.5373. Green open access

[thumbnail of Mansour_gps.5373.pdf]
Preview
Text
Mansour_gps.5373.pdf - Published Version

Download (928kB) | Preview

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Many people live with an awareness of mild cognitive changes that increase their dementia risk. Previous authors describe the uncertainties of this liminal state, between cognitive health and dementia, where being "at risk" can itself be an illness. We ask how services respond to people with memory concerns currently, and how a future, effective and inclusive dementia prevention intervention might be structured for people with memory concerns. METHODS/DESIGN: We conducted qualitative interviews with 18 people aged 60+ with subjective or objective memory problems, six family members, 10 health and social care professionals and 11 third sector workers. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using an inductive thematic approach. RESULTS: Three main themes were identified: 1) acknowledging the liminal state, compounded by current, discordant health service responses: medicalising memory concerns yet situating responsibilities for their management with patients and families; 2) enabling change in challenging contexts of physical and cognitive frailty and social disengagement, and 3) building on existing values, cultures and routines. CONCLUSIONS: Effective dementia prevention must empower individuals to make lifestyle changes within challenging contexts. Programmes must be evidence based yet sufficiently flexible to allow new activities to be fitted into people's current lives; and mindful of the risks of pathologising memory concerns. Most current memory services are neither commissioned, financially or clinically resourced to support people with memory concerns without dementia. Effective, large scale dementia prevention will require a broad societal response. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: "Falling through the cracks"; Stakeholders' views around the concept and diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and their understanding of dementia prevention
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/gps.5373
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.5373
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Cognitive concerns, dementia, mild cognitive impairment, prevention
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10104141
Downloads since deposit
29Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item