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An investigation into patterns of specialist service use among African/Caribbean families caring for an adult with learning disabilities.

Scarlett, Yvonne; (1999) An investigation into patterns of specialist service use among African/Caribbean families caring for an adult with learning disabilities. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Twenty-nine parents from African/Caribbean backgrounds caring for an adult son or daughter with learning disabilities in the home setting were interviewed regarding family circumstance, service awareness and receipt alongside their experiences of and views about the services they used. In addition, carer stress levels and factors associated with stress were examined. Carer awareness of both general and specialist services for people with learning disabilities were high however, service receipt was comparatively low. Carers were generally satisfied with the amount and quality of services they received. However, there was a general lack of confidence in the capability of services to help in times of crisis. Carers' opinions about barriers to accessing services were explored alongside their views about how services could be improved. A high level of stress was found in over half of the carers interviewed, which was associated with the number of heath problems suffered by the carer and the level of support needs of the adult being cared for. Families were living in circumstances of material deprivation caring for an adult with a high level of need, generally with little support from services. The implications of these findings for services are discussed.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: An investigation into patterns of specialist service use among African/Caribbean families caring for an adult with learning disabilities.
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10103928
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