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Comparing paediatric- and adult-onset linear morphoea in a large tertiary-referral scleroderma centre

Saracino, AM; George, C; Nihtyanova, SI; Denton, CP; (2020) Comparing paediatric- and adult-onset linear morphoea in a large tertiary-referral scleroderma centre. Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders 10.1177/2397198320925684. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Linear morphoea is a severe morphoea subtype associated with extracutaneous manifestations, potentially permanent disfigurement and functional impairment. Linear morphoea is more prevalent in paediatric patients, and knowledge of disease in adults is limited. The objective of this study was to compare paediatric- and adult-onset linear morphoea, in an exclusively adult population. / Methodology: This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with linear morphoea seen over a 3-year period at a single-site adult tertiary-referral Connective Tissue Disease centre. Clinical markers of disease severity and course, including anatomical distribution, extracutaneous manifestations, cutaneous symptoms, associated autoimmunity, inflammatory blood parameters, Dermatology Life Quality Index scores, treatment requirements and modified Localised Scleroderma Activity Tool were assessed and compared in paediatric- and adult-onset linear morphoea. / Results: Of 298 patients with morphoea seen during the study period, 135 had linear morphoea and 133 were included in the study. Most were female (78.9%), the mean age was 36.5 years and almost half (43.6%) had adult-onset disease. Disease was similarly severe between groups with regard to anatomical distribution, cutaneous symptoms (n = 89, 66.9%), extracutaneous manifestations (n = 76, 57.1%), antinuclear antibody–positivity (n = 40, 40.4%), raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (n = 27, 25.0%) and associated autoimmune diagnoses (n = 15, 11.3%). Prescribed treatments were similar between groups; 73.7% receiving methotrexate and almost one-third (32.3%) requiring more than one steroid-sparing agent. Those with paediatric-onset had more disease-related damage, with a mean modified Localised Scleroderma Skin Damage Index score of 19.5 (95% confidence interval: 17.0–22.0) versus 8.1 (95% confidence interval: 4.4–11.8; p < 0.001). Significantly more patients with adult-onset linear morphoea had quiescent disease (p = 0.0332), and even after correcting for disease duration, paediatric-onset patients still had 2.6 times greater odds of active disease (odds ratio = 2.59, 95% confidence interval: 0.9–7.6; p = 0.083). / Conclusion: Linear morphoea in adults can be a severe disease with extracutaneous, autoimmune and systemic features. Adults with paediatric-onset disease appear to have more severe cumulative damage, greater functional impairment and ongoing disease activity. This patient subgroup may require particularly close monitoring and more aggressive therapy.

Type: Article
Title: Comparing paediatric- and adult-onset linear morphoea in a large tertiary-referral scleroderma centre
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/2397198320925684
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/2397198320925684
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Localised scleroderma, morphoea, linear scleroderma, disease severity, adult morphoea
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10102600
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