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The Association between Adiposity, Mental Well-Being, and Quality of Life in Extreme Obesity

Jagielski, AC; Brown, A; Hosseini-Araghi, M; Thomas, GN; Taheri, S; (2014) The Association between Adiposity, Mental Well-Being, and Quality of Life in Extreme Obesity. PLOS ONE , 9 (3) , Article e92859. 10.1371/journal.pone.0092859. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives: To explore the cross-sectional association between adiposity, mental well-being, and quality of life in extreme obese individuals entering a UK specialist weight management service prior to treatment commencement. / Methods: The sample comprised 263 extreme obese individuals who were referred to the service as a result of having a body mass index (BMI) ≥40 kg/m2 or ≥35 kg/m2 with a co-morbid health condition. In a retrospective analysis, routinely collected baseline clinical examination data and self-report questionnaires (Impact of Weight on Quality of Life: IWQOL-Lite, EQ5D-3L, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale: HADS) were analysed to examine the cross-sectional association between adiposity and quality of life. / Results: The sample was predominantly female (74.8%) with mean BMI 47.0±7.9 kg/m2. Increasing adiposity was significantly negatively associated with quality of life, with an increase of 1 BMI unit associated with decreases of 1.93 in physical function (95% CI −2.86 − −1.00, p<0.001), 1.62 in self-esteem (95% CI −2.67 − −0.57, p<0.05), 2.69 in public distress (95% CI −3.75 − −1.62, p<0.001), 1.33 in work (95% CI −2.63 − −0.02, p<0.05), and 1.79 in total IWQOL-Lite scores (95% CI −2.65 − −0.93, p<0.001). Adiposity was associated with significantly increased risk of problems in mobility (OR = 3.44, 95% CI 1.47−8.05), and performing usual activities (OR = 2.45, 95% CI 1.10−5.46) in highest relative to lowest BMI tertile. The prevalence of experience of symptoms of anxiety (70.3%) and depression (66.2%) as measured by HADS was consistently high. / Conclusions: We identified a high prevalence of psychological co-morbidity, including widespread experience of symptoms of anxiety and depressive disorders and reduced quality of life among these extreme obese individuals seeking weight management treatment. Clinical implications include the need for the incorporation of strategies to improve mental well-being into multi-disciplinary weight management interventions.

Type: Article
Title: The Association between Adiposity, Mental Well-Being, and Quality of Life in Extreme Obesity
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092859
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0092859
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright: © 2014 Jagielski et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Obesity, Quality of life, Depression, Anxiety disorders, Body weight, Body mass index, Clinical psychology, Mental health and psychiatry
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Experimental and Translational Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10102390
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