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Feasibility of Estimation of Aortic Wave Intensity Using Non-invasive Pressure Recordings in the Absence of Flow Velocity in Man

Hughes, AD; Park, C; Ramakrishnan, A; Mayet, J; Chaturvedi, N; Parker, KH; (2020) Feasibility of Estimation of Aortic Wave Intensity Using Non-invasive Pressure Recordings in the Absence of Flow Velocity in Man. Frontiers in Physiology , 11 , Article 550. 10.3389/fphys.2020.00550. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Wave intensity analysis provides valuable information on ventriculo-arterial function, hemodynamics, and energy transfer in the arterial circulation. Widespread use of wave intensity analysis is limited by the need for concurrent measurement of pressure and flow waveforms. We describe a method that can estimate wave intensity patterns using only non-invasive pressure waveforms (pWIA). Methods: Radial artery pressure and left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) flow velocity waveforms were recorded in 12 participants in the Southall and Brent Revisited (SABRE) study. Pressure waveforms were analyzed using custom-written software to derive the excess pressure (P xs ) which was scaled to peak LVOT velocity and used to calculate wave intensity. These data were compared with wave intensity calculated using the measured LVOT flow velocity waveform. In a separate study, repeat measures of pWIA were performed on 34 individuals who attended two clinic visits at an interval of ≈1 month to assess reproducibility and reliability of the method. Results: P xs waveforms were similar in shape to aortic flow velocity waveforms and the time of peak P xs and peak aortic velocity agreed closely. Wave intensity estimated using pWIA showed acceptable agreement with estimates using LVOT velocity tracings and estimates of wave intensity were similar to values reported previously in the literature. The method showed fair to good reproducibility for most parameters. Conclusion: The P xs is a surrogate of LVOT flow velocity which, when appropriately scaled, allows estimation of aortic wave intensity with acceptable reproducibility. This may enable wider application of wave intensity analysis to large studies.

Type: Article
Title: Feasibility of Estimation of Aortic Wave Intensity Using Non-invasive Pressure Recordings in the Absence of Flow Velocity in Man
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fphys.2020.00550
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 Hughes, Park, Ramakrishnan, Mayet, Chaturvedi and Parker. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: aorta, blood flow, blood pressure, hemodynamics, wave intensity analysis, waves
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10102192
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