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On the performance evaluation of lithium-ion battery systems for dynamic load functions in warship hybrid power and propulsion systems

Farrier, Luke Alexander; (2020) On the performance evaluation of lithium-ion battery systems for dynamic load functions in warship hybrid power and propulsion systems. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Battery technology has developed to a juncture where high power and high energy density characteristics can be exploited for a common use battery energy storage system (ESS) for warship power systems to improve system steady state and dynamic performance. A critical review of previous research has exposed a lack of knowledge in performance assessment of battery ESS to operate as power reserve, to load level generator sets and supply laser directed energy weapons (LDEW) in a warship hybrid power and propulsion system. This research explores the performance impact of using a battery ESS in a candidate hybrid power and propulsion system. A simulation model of a lithium-ion nickel manganese cobalt based ESS was developed and validated against high rates of charge and discharge. Three system models were developed to explore the steady state, quasi-steady state and dynamic performance of the candidate power system when the battery is integrated. Three key investigations were conducted using the respective system models. The first explored the effects of ESS on the candidate power system performance when the ESS is operated as power reserve. Analysis showed that a 40% reduction in exhaust greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions was potentially achievable from the candidate warship compared to conventional operating practice. The second explored power system performance when operating the ESS operates to load level a diesel generator under quasi-steady state conditions. A 2% droop limit is suggested to mitigate against adverse quality of power supply (QPS) conditions for electrical consumers. The third investigation, and key contribution to the field of naval power systems, explored the impact of LDEW demands on the transient response of the ESS and system quality of power supply. The research findings show that the battery ESS is capable of high rates of fire for extended periods subject to state of charge operating limitations. To mitigate against adverse QPS conditions and provide operators with a realistic operating envelope to power the laser with the battery ESS, it is recommended that the power limit of the laser load should be 1.75 MW peak power.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: On the performance evaluation of lithium-ion battery systems for dynamic load functions in warship hybrid power and propulsion systems
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author [year]. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10102067
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