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Adipose derived stem cells and platelet rich plasma improve the tissue integration and angiogenesis of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue regeneration

Naderi, N; Griffin, MF; Mosahebi, A; Butler, PE; Seifalian, AM; (2020) Adipose derived stem cells and platelet rich plasma improve the tissue integration and angiogenesis of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue regeneration. Molecular Biology Reports , 47 pp. 2005-2013. 10.1007/s11033-020-05297-7. Green open access

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Abstract

Current surgical reconstruction for soft tissue replacement involves lipotransfer to restore soft tissue replacements but is limited by survival and longevity of the fat tissue. Alternative approaches to overcome these limitations include using biodegradable scaffolds with stem cells with growth factors to generate soft tissue. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) offer great potential to differentiate into adipose, and can be delivered using biodegradable scaffolds. However, the optimal scaffold to maximise this approach is unknown. This study investigates the biocompatibility of nanocomposite scaffolds (POSS-PCL) to deliver ADSCs with and without the addition of growth factors using platelet rich plasma (PRP) in vivo. Rat ADSCs were isolated and then seeded on biodegradable scaffolds (POSS-PCL). In addition, donor rats were used to isolate PRP to modify the scaffolds. The implants were then subcutaneously implanted for 3-months to assess the effect of PRP and ADSC on POSS-PCL scaffolds biocompatibility. Histology after explanation was examined to assess tissue integration (H&E) and collagen production (Massons Trichome). Immunohistochemistry was used to assess angiogenesis (CD3, α-SMA), immune response (CD45, CD68) and adipose formation (PPAR-γ). At 3-months PRP-ADSC-POSS-PCL scaffolds demonstrated significantly increased tissue integration and angiogenesis compared to PRP, ADSC and unmodified scaffolds (p < 0.05). In addition, PRP-ADSC-POSS-PCL scaffolds showed similar levels of CD45 and CD68 staining compared to unmodified scaffolds. Furthermore, there was increased PPAR-γ staining demonstrated at 3-months with PRP-ADSC-POSS-PCL scaffolds (p < 0.05). POSS-PCL nanocomposite scaffolds provide an effective delivery system for ADSCs. PRP and ADSC work synergistically to enhance the biocompatibility of POSS-PCL scaffolds and provide a platform technology for soft tissue regeneration.

Type: Article
Title: Adipose derived stem cells and platelet rich plasma improve the tissue integration and angiogenesis of biodegradable scaffolds for soft tissue regeneration
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s11033-020-05297-7
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11033-020-05297-7
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Soft tissue regeneration, Adipose stem cells, Platelet rich plasma, Biodegradable scaffolds, Nanocomposite scaffolds
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Surgical Biotechnology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10101910
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