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Magnetic resonance imaging of diffusion and perfusion: Techniques and applications to cerebral ischaemia

Thomas, David Lee; (1999) Magnetic resonance imaging of diffusion and perfusion: Techniques and applications to cerebral ischaemia. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Stroke and other cerebrovascular diseases are among the most common causes of death and disease in the Western world. Over recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of tissue damage caused by cerebral ischaemia. Several techniques have been developed using MRI methods which enable different aspects of tissue status to be monitored. The aim of the work presented in this thesis was to develop these techniques and apply them to the study of experimental cerebral ischaemia in animal models of stroke. The non-invasive method of perfusion imaging known as FAIR was implemented. The method was developed to enable accurate quantitation of perfusion with good time efficiency by incorporation of a global pre-saturation pulse into the sequence. Transit time effects were minimised by the use of high definition adiabatic RF pulses. Use of the sequence to follow a perfusion time course in a gerbil model of transient global ischaemia is demonstrated. New techniques were developed for T2* mapping, using an interleaved echo planar imaging (EPI) approach, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), using a version of magnetisation prepared TurboFLASH. The use of both the T2* and DWI sequences is demonstrated on phantoms and in vivo. Finally, MRI was used in the investigation of cerebral pathophysiology following middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat at 8.5T. Continuous arterial spin labelling was used to monitor levels of perfusion, and ADC, T1 and T2 were also measured for a period of several hours after occlusion. Immediate changes in all parameters were observed, and physiological mechanisms for these changes and the potential for their diagnostic use are discussed.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of diffusion and perfusion: Techniques and applications to cerebral ischaemia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
Keywords: Health and environmental sciences; Ischaemia; Perfusion
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10101694
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