UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Co-Existence of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Bartter Syndrome due to Maternal Uniparental Isodisomy of HSD3B2 and CLCNKB Mutations

Giri, D; Bockenhauer, D; Deshpande, C; Achermann, JC; Taylor, NF; Rumsby, G; Morgan, H; ... Ajzensztejn, M; + view all (2020) Co-Existence of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Bartter Syndrome due to Maternal Uniparental Isodisomy of HSD3B2 and CLCNKB Mutations. Hormone Research in Paediatrics 10.1159/000507577. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of Achermann_giri et al revised.pdf]
Preview
Text
Achermann_giri et al revised.pdf - Accepted Version

Download (339kB) | Preview

Abstract

Introduction: We present a patient with co-existence of 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD3B2) deficiency and Bartter syndrome, a unique dual combination of opposing pathologies that has not been reported previously in the literature. Case: A female infant (46,XX) born at 34/40 weeks’ gestation, weighing 2.67 kg (−1.54 standard deviation score) to non-consanguineous parents presented on day 4 of life with significant weight loss. Subsequent investigations revealed hyponatraemia, hypochloraemia, metabolic alkalosis, elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone, ACTH, and renin. Urine steroid profile suggested HSD3B2 deficiency, which was confirmed by the identification of a homozygous HSD3B2 mutation. Due to the persistence of the hypochlo­raemic and hypokalemic alkalosis, an underlying renal tubulopathy was suspected. Sequence analysis of a targeted tubulopathy gene panel revealed a homozygous deletion in CLCNKB, consistent with Bartter syndrome type 3. The mother was found to be heterozygous for both mutations in ­HSD3B2 and CLCNKB, and the father was negative for both. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis confirmed 2 segments of homozygosity on chromosome 1 of maternal ancestry, encompassing both HSD3B2 and CLCKNB. Discussion: Identification of a homozygous rare mutation in an offspring of non-consanguineous parents should raise suspicion of uniparental disomy, especially if the phenotype is unusual, potentially encompassing more than one disorder. The persistence of hypokalemic alkalosis, the biochemical fingerprint of hyperaldosteronism in a child with a form of CAH in which aldosterone production is severely impaired, challenges our current understanding of mineralocorticoid-mediated effects in the collecting duct.

Type: Article
Title: Co-Existence of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Bartter Syndrome due to Maternal Uniparental Isodisomy of HSD3B2 and CLCNKB Mutations
Location: Switzerland
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1159/000507577
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1159/000507577
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: HSD3B2 deficiency · Bartter syndrome · Maternal isodisomy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Renal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Genetics and Genomic Medicine Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10100564
Downloads since deposit
131Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item