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The role of cognitive factors in adolescents' recovery from corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis

O'Ryan, Dominic; (1999) The role of cognitive factors in adolescents' recovery from corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Doctoral thesis (D.Clin.Psy.), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This study explores the experience of adolescents in hospital. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between health cognitions and pre and post operative health status in young people having major surgery. A sample of adolescent patients with idiopathic scoliosis (a progressive deformity of the spine) having corrective surgery at an orthopaedic hospital was assessed pre and post operatively. Standardised self report questionnaires were used to assess perceived value of health, locus of control, acceptance, satisfaction with care, depression and anxiety. Pain, functioning and self image associated with the disorder were also assessed and biomedical data including deformity and duration of surgery were recorded. Using a semi-structured interview, a subset of the patients discharged from hospital was asked about their expectations of, preparation for and experience of hospitalisation. Analysis of variance was used to explore the interactions between health beliefs and health status in recovery. The deformity appeared to be portrayed as external to the youngsters and an external perceived control was associated with better health status preoperatively. At follow up, a more internal locus of perceived control was associated with better recovery.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: D.Clin.Psy.
Title: The role of cognitive factors in adolescents' recovery from corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
Keywords: Psychology; Health cognitions
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10099227
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