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Human thermal comfort in tropical climates

Abdulshukor, Abdulmalik Bin; (1993) Human thermal comfort in tropical climates. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

There is considerable disagreement in the research community concerning whether comfort standards developed in the temperate climates of Europe and North America are appropriate for use in countries with more extreme climatic conditions. This is because some researchers, mainly employing thermal chamber methods, have found that thermal comfort is independent of geographical locations, while other researchers using the field method have found that thermal comfort is dependent on local average ambient conditions. It is also well-known that air-conditioned buildings in tropical countries are overcooled to western standards. This thesis sets out to develop a recommended Thermal Comfort Zone for Malaysia, based on the thermal comfort votes of Malaysians in their own country. Secondly, the thesis determines whether there is any significant difference between the votes of different ethnic and gender groups of Malaysians. The tests also compare the significance between the thermal sensation and the thermal comfort votes of each group. Finally, the study determines whether acclimatisation affects the voting trends of Malaysians by comparing the votes of Malaysian students in Malaysia with those of Malaysian students in the U.K.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Human thermal comfort in tropical climates
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
Keywords: Earth sciences; Climates; Comfort; Thermal; Tropical
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10098857
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