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Distance travelled to hospital for emergency laparotomy and the effect of travel time on mortality: cohort study

Salih, T; Martin, P; Poulton, T; Oliver, CM; Bassett, M; Moonesinghe, SR; (2021) Distance travelled to hospital for emergency laparotomy and the effect of travel time on mortality: cohort study. BMJ Quality and Safety , 30 (5) pp. 397-406. 10.1136/bmjqs-2019-010747. Green open access

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Abstract

Objectives To evaluate whether distance and estimated travel time to hospital for patients undergoing emergency laparotomy is associated with postoperative mortality. Design National cohort study using data from the National Emergency Laparotomy Audit. Setting 171 National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales. Participants 22 772 adult patients undergoing emergency surgery on the gastrointestinal tract between 2013 and 2016. Main outcome measures Mortality from any cause and in any place at 30 and 90 days after surgery. Results Median on-road distance between home and hospital was 8.4 km (IQR 4.7–16.7 km) with a median estimated travel time of 16 min. Median time from hospital admission to operating theatre was 12.7 hours. Older patients live on average further from hospital and patients from areas of increased socioeconomic deprivation live on average less far away. We included estimated travel time as a continuous variable in multilevel logistic regression models adjusting for important confounders and found no evidence for an association with 30-day mortality (OR per 10 min of travel time=1.02, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.06, p=0.512) or 90-day mortality (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.97 to 1.06, p=0.472). The results were similar when we limited our analysis to the subgroup of 5386 patients undergoing the most urgent surgery. 30-day mortality: OR=1.02 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.10, p=0.574) and 90-day mortality: OR=1.01 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.08, p=0.858). Conclusions In the UK NHS, estimated travel time between home and hospital was not a primary determinant of short-term mortality following emergency gastrointestinal surgery.

Type: Article
Title: Distance travelled to hospital for emergency laparotomy and the effect of travel time on mortality: cohort study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/bmjqs-2019-010747
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2019-010747
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Targeted Intervention
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Applied Health Research
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10098729
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