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Acute myocardial infarctions and stroke triggered by laboratory-confirmed respiratory infections in Denmark, 2010 to 2016

Ohland, J; Warren-Gash, C; Blackburn, R; Mølbak, K; Valentiner-Branth, P; Nielsen, J; Emborg, H-D; (2020) Acute myocardial infarctions and stroke triggered by laboratory-confirmed respiratory infections in Denmark, 2010 to 2016. Euro Surveillance , 25 (17) 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.17.1900199. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Several studies have investigated a possible association between respiratory infection and acute myocardial infarction (MI). As both influenza and pneumococcal infections are vaccine preventable, understanding the populations affected by virus-induced cardiovascular complications is important to guide public health and clinical practice. Aim: This observational study aimed to quantify the association between laboratory-confirmed respiratory bacteria or virus infections and risk of first MI or stroke, by using self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis of anonymised linked electronic Danish health records. Methods: The SCCS method was used to determine the relative incidence of the first event of MI and stroke occurring within 28 days after laboratory-confirmed respiratory infections compared with the baseline time period. Results: In the age and season adjusted analyses for first acute MI, the incidence ratios (IR) of a MI event occurring during the risk period were significantly elevated following a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with values of 20.1, 11.0 and 4.9 during 1-3, 4-7 and 8-14 days, respectively and following respiratory virus infection with values of 15.2, 4.5 and 4.4 during 1-3, 8-14 and 15-28 days, respectively. The significantly elevated IRs for stroke following an S. pneumoniae infection were 25.5 and 6.3 during 1-3 and 8-14 days, respectively and following respiratory virus infection 8.3, 7.8 and 6.2 during 1-3, 4-7 and 8-14 days, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggested a significant cardiovascular event triggering effect following infection with S. pneumoniae and respiratory viruses (mainly influenza), indicating the importance of protection against vaccine-preventable respiratory infections.

Type: Article
Title: Acute myocardial infarctions and stroke triggered by laboratory-confirmed respiratory infections in Denmark, 2010 to 2016
Location: Sweden
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.17.1900199
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2807/1560-7917.ES.2020.25.17....
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, respiratory infections self-controlled case series method
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Health Informatics
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10098697
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