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Is there an association between perceived social support and cardiovascular health behaviours in people with severe mental illnesses?

Burton, A; Walters, K; Marston, L; Osborn, D; (2020) Is there an association between perceived social support and cardiovascular health behaviours in people with severe mental illnesses? Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology 10.1007/s00127-020-01879-9. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: People with severe mental illnesses (SMI) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Research in the general population suggests that social support may protect against increased CVD morbidity and mortality; however, this may not apply to those with SMI. We aimed to explore the association between perceived social support and attendance at primary care nurse CVD risk reduction clinic appointments and CVD risk-reducing behaviours in an SMI population with elevated CVD risk factors. METHODS: We used longitudinal and cross-sectional data from a randomised controlled trial on 326 adults with SMI recruited via 76 general practices in England. Multilevel regression analysis estimated the effect of perceived social support on attendance at CVD risk reduction clinic appointments over 6 months, and adherence to CVD medication, physical activity, diet, smoking and alcohol use at baseline, adjusted by age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, psychiatric diagnosis and employment. RESULTS: Perceived social support predicted greater appointment attendance in unadjusted (IRR = 1.005; 1.000-1.010; p = 0.05) but not adjusted analysis (IRR = 1.003; 0.998-1.009; p = 0.25). Perceived social support was associated with greater adherence to medication; for each 1% increase in social support, there was a 4.2% increase in medication adherence (OR = 1.042; 1.015-1.070; p = 0.002). No association was found between greater perceived social support and greater physical activity, lower sedentary behaviour, healthier diet, lower alcohol use or being a non-smoker. CONCLUSIONS: Social support may be an important facilitator for CVD medication adherence and is potentially important for primary care appointment attendance; however, alternative strategies might be needed to help people with SMI engage in physical activity, healthier diets and to reduce their smoking and alcohol use.

Type: Article
Title: Is there an association between perceived social support and cardiovascular health behaviours in people with severe mental illnesses?
Location: Germany
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s00127-020-01879-9
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00127-020-01879-9
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Cardiovascular disease, Primary care, Severe mental illness, Social support
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Behavioural Science and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10098127
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