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Self-Monitoring for speech and its links to age, cognitive effort, schizotypal trait expression and impulsivity during adolescence

Salaminios, G; Morosan, L; Toffel, E; Tanzer, M; Eliez, S; Debbané, M; (2020) Self-Monitoring for speech and its links to age, cognitive effort, schizotypal trait expression and impulsivity during adolescence. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry , 25 (3) pp. 215-230. 10.1080/13546805.2020.1734552.

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Abstract

Introduction: Disruptions in self-monitoring processes represent key cognitive factors associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In the current study, we assessed the effects of age and cognitive effort on self-monitoring for speech in adolescence, as well as its associations with personality dimensions pertaining to schizotypy and impulsivity. / Methods: 121 community adolescents undertook a self-monitoring task that assesses the capacity to discriminate between self-generated overt and silent speech, for items requiring different levels of cognitive effort. Self-report measures were used to assess trait dimensions of schizotypy and impulsivity. / Results: Cognitive effort, but not age, contributed to the overall rate of self-monitoring errors. Contrary to clinical psychosis and high risk samples, increased cognitive effort in healthy adolescents led to more internalising than externalising self-monitoring errors. Higher scores on the interpersonal dimension of schizotypy were associated with increases in the total rate of self-monitoring errors. No associations were found between positive schizotypy and externalising self-monitoring misattributions. Finally, trait impulsivity dimensions were not associated with self-monitoring performance. / Conclusions: The present findings suggest that self-monitoring confusions may be linked to trait-risk for psychosis in adolescence. Future studies can prospectively assess whether the association between negative schizotypal traits and self-monitoring represents a distal marker of psychosis vulnerability.

Type: Article
Title: Self-Monitoring for speech and its links to age, cognitive effort, schizotypal trait expression and impulsivity during adolescence
DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2020.1734552
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/13546805.2020.1734552
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Source monitoring, schizotypy, schizophrenia, personality, psychosis risk
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097292
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