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Minority Stress, Campaign Messages and Political Participation during the Australian Marriage Plebiscite

Bartos, SE; Noon, DW; Frost, DM; (2020) Minority Stress, Campaign Messages and Political Participation during the Australian Marriage Plebiscite. Sexuality Research and Social Policy 10.1007/s13178-020-00444-y. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Background: The health and wellbeing of sexual minorities is adversely impacted by a set of factors collectively known as minority stress. Recently, negative campaigns preceding gay-rights referenda have put further pressure on sexual minorities. However, active participation in political campaigns is expected to foster wellbeing. This study explores the mechanisms through which political campaigns affect psychological distress in sexual minorities. / Method: We conducted a survey with 318 Australian sexual minority individuals during the campaign for the same-sex marriage postal vote in 2017. / Results: As expected, exposure to negative campaign messages was associated with psychological distress. This association persisted controlling for the effects of everyday stress. The effect of exposure to negative campaign messages was no longer significant when controlling for minority stressors like internalized homophobia, expectations of rejection, and everyday discrimination. Political participation was also associated with psychological distress. Post hoc analyses supported a model whereby minority stressors mediated the associations of campaign messages and political participation with distress. / Conclusion: Minority stress provides a flexible theoretical framework that can incorporate novel challenges to the wellbeing of sexual minorities.

Type: Article
Title: Minority Stress, Campaign Messages and Political Participation during the Australian Marriage Plebiscite
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1007/s13178-020-00444-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-020-00444-y
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: Minority stress, Referendum, Gay rights, Political participation, Collective action
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Research Institute
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097222
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