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Bidirectional relation between affective symptoms and cognitive function from middle to late adulthood: a population-based birth cohort study

John, A; Rusted, J; Richards, M; Gaysina, D; (2020) Bidirectional relation between affective symptoms and cognitive function from middle to late adulthood: a population-based birth cohort study. Aging & Mental Health 10.1080/13607863.2020.1758916. (In press).

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Abstract

Objectives: There is an association between affective symptoms and cognition. However, the direction of this association remains unclear. This study aimed to test bidirectional relationships between affective symptoms and cognition from middle to late adulthood.Method: Data were available from the MRC National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD), a prospective birth cohort of 5362 people born in 1946. Affective symptoms and cognition were measured at ages 53, 60-64, and 69. Latent scores of affective symptoms were derived and cross-lagged models were fitted for affective symptoms with verbal memory and processing speed. Results: Results revealed an inverse cross-sectional association between affective symptoms and verbal memory (β=-0.18, SE=0.04, p<.001) and processing speed (β=-0.13, SE=0.06, p=.05) at age 53, but not at ages 60-64 or 69. Affective symptoms at age 53 predicted lower verbal memory at age 60-64 (β=-0.58, SE=0.27, p=.03), and affective symptoms at age 60-64 predicted lower verbal memory (β=-0.64, SE=0.29, p=.03) and processing speed (β=-1.27, SE=0.41, p=.002) at age 69. Verbal memory and processing speed did not predict subsequent affective symptoms.Conclusion: Affective symptoms predict poorer verbal memory and processing speed over a period of 16 years, but not vice versa.

Type: Article
Title: Bidirectional relation between affective symptoms and cognitive function from middle to late adulthood: a population-based birth cohort study
Location: England
DOI: 10.1080/13607863.2020.1758916
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2020.1758916
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Longitudinal, ageing, anxiety, cognition, depression, memory
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097178
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