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PPI Questionnaire on Adaptive Wearable Appropriateness as an Autistic Intervention

RUTTENBERG, D; (2020) PPI Questionnaire on Adaptive Wearable Appropriateness as an Autistic Intervention. 10.31219/osf.io/a3jbz. (In press).

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RUTTENBERG Research Paper #2--Sensorable Pilot PPI.pdf - Accepted version
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Abstract

Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC) is a life-long diagnosis, which has a subset of features including hyper-, seeking- and/or hypo-reactivity to sensory inputs or unusual interests (APA, 2013). These qualities are evident across environmental (e.g. response to specific sounds, visual fascination with lights or movements) and physiological domains (e.g. anxiety, respiration or euthermia). Scholars report that ninety (90%) of autistic adults experience sensory issues causing significant barriers at school/work (Leekam et al., 2007). As part of a larger PhD Research Project, this pilot study establishes designs, processes and measures that may establish if autistic individuals find value utilising adaptive/wearable interventions that possibly alter, redirect and/or attenuate disruptive stimuli. This study incorporates benign information not yet containing practical data, other than to provision and trial space where real data is nominally present. This pilot loads systems functionality for future use (e.g. consent, demographic collection, measures, post-mortem/survey feedback, storage, sorting, query, statistical analyses and reporting). Finally, this pilot provisions a follow-on and full-fledge Participant Public Involvement (PPI) designed to exploit data from focus group and co-produced surveys/designs. In turn, these may be used to inform an as-yet-to-be developed interventional prototype. Hence, the forthcoming PPI—by leveraging this pilot—aims to describe what degree sensory distractions occur among adolescent and adult ASC participants. Both pilot and PPI aspire to whether focus, anxiety and attentional concerns are perceived as negative issues and if individuals prefer assistance (vis à vis assistive wearables) to reduce anxiety, distractions and increase focus at school and at work (Bagley et al., 2016). This study results yield promise; in that, a subsequent PPI can be leveraged to obtain co-designed autistic data leading to a randomised clinical trial.

Type: Article
Title: PPI Questionnaire on Adaptive Wearable Appropriateness as an Autistic Intervention
DOI: 10.31219/osf.io/a3jbz
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/a3jbz
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Culture, Communication and Media
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10097073
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