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Radiation therapy and the innate immune response: clinical implications for immunotherapy approaches

Gomez, V; Mustapha, R; Ng, K; Ng, T; (2020) Radiation therapy and the innate immune response: clinical implications for immunotherapy approaches. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology , 86 (9) pp. 1726-1735. 10.1111/bcp.14351. Green open access

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Abstract

Radiation therapy is an essential component of cancer care, contributing up to 40% of curative cancer treatment regimens. It creates DNA double‐strand breaks causing cell death in highly replicating tumour cells. However, tumours can develop acquired resistance to therapy. The efficiency of radiation treatment has been increased by means of combining it with other approaches such as chemotherapy, molecule‐targeted therapies and, in recent years, immunotherapy (IT). Cancer‐cell apoptosis after radiation treatment causes an immunological reaction that contributes to eradicating the tumour via antigen presentation and subsequent T‐cell activation. By contrast, radiotherapy also contributes to the formation of an immunosuppressive environment that hinders the efficacy of the therapy. Innate immune cells from myeloid and lymphoid origin show a very active role in both acquired resistance and antitumourigenic mechanisms. Therefore, many efforts are being made in order to reach a better understanding of the innate immunity reactions after radiation therapy (RT) and the design of new combinatorial IT strategies focused in these particular populations.

Type: Article
Title: Radiation therapy and the innate immune response: clinical implications for immunotherapy approaches
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/bcp.14351
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.14351
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10096657
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