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Experimental Assessment of the Surface Quality of 3D Printed Bones

Carew, R; Morgan, R; Rando, C; (2020) Experimental Assessment of the Surface Quality of 3D Printed Bones. Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences 10.1080/00450618.2020.1759684. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

3D printed replicas of human remains are useful tools in courtroom demonstrations. Presently, little published research has investigated the surface quality of printed replicas for use in the presentation of forensic anthropology evidence. In this study, 3D printed replicas of nine human bones were reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) scan data using selective laser sintering (SLS). A three-phased approach assessed: i) the metric accuracy of the 3D prints; ii) the viability of applying age and sex estimation methods (with multiple observers (n = 8); and, iii) the surface quality using a customized scoring method (with multiple observers (n = 8)). The results confirmed that the prints in this study were accurate to within 2.0 mm of the original dry bone. Observers were able to confidently assess the gross features of the prints; however fine surface details were not always well represented compared to the dry bones. These findings confirm the applicability of 3D printed replicas for courtroom exhibition of gross features but offer caution against their use when fine detailing is important for evaluative interpretation.

Type: Article
Title: Experimental Assessment of the Surface Quality of 3D Printed Bones
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/00450618.2020.1759684
Publisher version: https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tajf20/current
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Forensic science, forensic anthropology, evidence reconstruction, 3D printing
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of S&HS > Institute of Archaeology > Institute of Archaeology Gordon Square
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095707
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