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CSF amyloid is a consistent predictor of white matter hyperintensities across the disease course from aging to Alzheimer's disease

Walsh, P; Sudre, CH; Fiford, CM; Ryan, NS; Lashley, T; Frost, C; Barnes, J; (2020) CSF amyloid is a consistent predictor of white matter hyperintensities across the disease course from aging to Alzheimer's disease. Neurobiology of Aging , 91 pp. 5-14. 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.03.008. Green open access

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Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers. Subjects included 180 controls, 107 individuals with a significant memory concern, 320 individuals with early mild cognitive impairment, 171 individuals with late mild cognitive impairment, and 151 individuals with AD, with 3T MRI and CSF Aβ1-42, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) data. Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationship between WMH and CSF Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau. Directionally, a higher WMH burden was associated with lower CSF Aβ1-42 within each diagnostic group, with no evidence for a difference in the slope of the association across diagnostic groups (p = 0.4). Pooling all participants, this association was statistically significant after adjustment for t-tau, p-tau, age, diagnostic group, and APOE-ε4 status (p < 0.001). Age was the strongest predictor of WMH (partial R2~16%) compared with CSF Aβ1-42 (partial R2~5%). There was no evidence for an association with WMH and either t-tau or p-tau. These data are supportive of a link between amyloid burden and presumed vascular pathology.

Type: Article
Title: CSF amyloid is a consistent predictor of white matter hyperintensities across the disease course from aging to Alzheimer's disease
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.03.008
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.03.0...
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid, Cerebrospinal fluid, Tau, Vascular disease, White matter hyperintensities
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neurodegenerative Diseases
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095502
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