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Characterization of dimensional, morphological and morphometric features of retrieved 3D-printed acetabular cups for hip arthroplasty

Dall’Ava, L; Hothi, H; Henckel, J; Di Laura, A; Shearing, P; Hart, A; (2020) Characterization of dimensional, morphological and morphometric features of retrieved 3D-printed acetabular cups for hip arthroplasty. Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research , 15 , Article 157. 10.1186/s13018-020-01665-y. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Three-dimensional (3D) printing of porous titanium implants is increasing in orthopaedics, promising enhanced bony fixation whilst maintaining design similarities with conventionally manufactured components. Our study is one of the first to non-destructively characterize 3D-printed implants, using conventionally manufactured components as a reference. Methods: We analysed 16 acetabular cups retrieved from patients, divided into two groups: ‘3D-printed’ (n = 6) and ‘conventional’ (n = 10). Coordinate-measuring machine (CMM), electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) were used to investigate the roundness of the internal cup surface, the morphology of the backside surface and the morphometric features of the porous structures of the cups, respectively. The amount of bony attachment was also evaluated. Results: CMM analysis showed a median roundness of 19.45 and 14.52 μm for 3D-printed and conventional cups, respectively (p = 0.1114). SEM images revealed partially molten particles on the struts of 3D-printed implants; these are a by-product of the manufacturing technique, unlike the beads shown by conventional cups. As expected, porosity, pore size, strut thickness and thickness of the porous structure were significantly higher for 3D-printed components (p = 0.0002), with median values of 72.3%, 915 μm, 498 μm and 1.287 mm (p = 0.0002). The median values of bony attachment were 84.9% and 69.3% for 3D-printed and conventional cups, respectively (p = 0.2635). Conclusion: 3D-printed implants are designed to be significantly more porous than some conventional components, as shown in this study, whilst still exhibiting the same shape and size. We found differences in the surface morphologies of the groups, related to the different manufacturing methods; a key finding was the presence of partially molten particles on the 3D-printed cups.

Type: Article
Title: Characterization of dimensional, morphological and morphometric features of retrieved 3D-printed acetabular cups for hip arthroplasty
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13018-020-01665-y
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13018-020-01665-y
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Keywords: 3D printing, Additive manufacturing, Orthopaedic implants, Hip arthroplasty, Porous acetabular cups
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci > Department of Ortho and MSK Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095496
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