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Retrospective analysis of infliximab and adalimumab treatment in a large cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis patients

Campanilho-Marques, R; Deakin, CT; Simou, S; Papadopoulou, C; Wedderburn, LR; Pilkington, CA; Juvenile Dermatomyositis Research Group (JDRG); (2020) Retrospective analysis of infliximab and adalimumab treatment in a large cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis patients. Arthritis Research & Therapy , 22 (1) , Article 79. 10.1186/s13075-020-02164-5. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Anti-TNF treatment may be useful for the treatment of patients with refractory juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). The aim of this study was to describe the use of infliximab and adalimumab therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis as an adjunctive treatment. METHODS: Sixty children recruited to the UK JDM Cohort and Biomarker Study that had received at least 3 months of anti-TNF treatment (infliximab or adalimumab) were studied. Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS), Manual Muscle Testing (MMT8) and physician's global assessment (PGA) were recorded. Skin disease was assessed using the modified skin disease activity score (DAS). Data were analysed using Friedman's test for repeated measures analysis of variance. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, there were improvements at 6 and 12 months in skin disease (χ2(2) = 15.52, p = 0.00043), global disease (χ2(2) = 8.14, p = 0.017) and muscle disease (CMAS χ2(2) = 17.02, p = 0.0002 and MMT χ2(2) = 10.56, p = 0.005) in infliximab patients. For patients who switched from infliximab to adalimumab, there was improvement in global disease activity (χ2(2) = 6.73, p = 0.03), and trends towards improvement in CMAS, MMT8 and modified DAS. The median initial prednisolone dose was 6 [0-10] mg, and final was 2.5 [0-7.5] mg (p < 0.0001). Fifty-four per cent of patients had a reduction in the number and/or size of calcinosis lesions. Twenty-five per cent switched their anti-TNF treatment from infliximab to adalimumab. 66.7%of the switches were to improve disease control, 26.7% due to adverse events and 6.6% due to patient preference. A total of 13.9 adverse reactions occurred in 100 patient-years, of which 5.7 were considered serious. CONCLUSION: Reductions in muscle and skin disease, including calcinosis, were seen following treatment with infliximab and adalimumab.

Type: Article
Title: Retrospective analysis of infliximab and adalimumab treatment in a large cohort of juvenile dermatomyositis patients
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s13075-020-02164-5
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13075-020-02164-5
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Keywords: Adalimumab, Biologic therapy, Infliximab, Juvenile dermatomyositis, P rheumatology
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Developmental Biology and Cancer Dept
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH - Laboratory Management
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Infection, Immunity and Inflammation Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095323
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