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Longitudinal assessment of multiple sclerosis with the brain-age paradigm

Cole, JH; Raffel, J; Friede, T; Eshaghi, A; Brownlee, WJ; Chard, D; De Stefano, N; ... MAGNIMS study group, ; + view all (2020) Longitudinal assessment of multiple sclerosis with the brain-age paradigm. Annals of Neurology , 88 (1) pp. 93-105. 10.1002/ana.25746. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: During the natural course of MS, the brain is exposed to ageing as well as disease effects. Brain ageing can be modelled statistically; the so-called 'brain-age' paradigm. Here, we evaluated whether brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD) was sensitive to the presence of MS, clinical progression and future outcomes. METHODS: In a longitudinal, multi-centre sample of 3,565 MRI scans, in 1,204 MS and clinically-isolated syndrome (CIS) patients and 150 healthy controls (mean follow-up time: patients 3.41 years, healthy controls 1.97 years), we measured 'brain-predicted age' using T1-weighted MRI. We compared brain-PAD between MS and CIS patients and healthy controls, and between disease subtypes. Relationships between brain-PAD and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were explored. RESULTS: MS patients had markedly higher brain-PAD than healthy controls (mean brain-PAD +10.3 years [95% CI 8.5, 12.1] versus 4.3 years [-2.1, 6.4], p < 0.001). The highest brain-PADs were in secondary-progressive MS (+19.4 years [17.1, 21.9]). Brain-PAD at study entry predicted time-to-disability progression (hazard ratio 1.02 [1.01, 1.03], p < 0.001); though normalised brain volume was a stronger predictor. Greater annualised brain-PAD increases were associated with greater annualised EDSS score (r = 0.26, p < 0.001). INTERPRETATION: The brain-age paradigm is sensitive to MS-related atrophy and clinical progression. A higher brain-PAD at baseline was associated with more rapid disability progression and the rate of change in brain-PAD related to worsening disability. Potentially, 'brain-age' could be used as a prognostic biomarker in early-stage MS, to track disease progression or stratify patients for clinical trial enrolment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Longitudinal assessment of multiple sclerosis with the brain-age paradigm
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/ana.25746
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.25746
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 The Authors. Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association. 1This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproductionin any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Multiple sclerosis, brain ageing, neuroimaging
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Ophthalmology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10095305
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