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Reliability and validity of a temporal distancing emotion regulation task in adolescence

Suksasilp, C; Griffiths, S; Sebastian, CL; Norbury, C; SCALES Team, .; (2020) Reliability and validity of a temporal distancing emotion regulation task in adolescence. Emotion 10.1037/emo0000744. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Adopting a temporally distant perspective on stressors, also known as using a temporal distancing emotion regulation strategy, can alleviate distress. Young adults' ability to adopt a temporal distancing strategy has previously been measured using an experimental temporal distancing task (Ahmed, Somerville, & Sebastian, 2018). In the current study, we evaluate the psychometric properties of this task in younger (N = 345, aged 10-11) and older (N = 99, aged 18-21) adolescents and explore developmental differences in the ability to use temporal distancing to alleviate distress. Participants listened to scenarios and rated negative affect when adopting a distant-future perspective, a near-future perspective, or when reacting naturally. We evaluated the test-retest reliability of the measure in older adolescents and its construct validity in both younger and older adolescents by assessing correlations with self-report measures of emotion regulation strategy use. Our findings broadly replicated those of Ahmed et al. (2018): Adopting distant- and near-future perspectives produced significantly lower self-reported distress relative to reacting naturally, with the distant-future strategy producing the least distress. Older adolescents alleviated their distress more effectively than younger adolescents and reported projecting further into the future. Regulation success scores on the temporal distancing task showed adequate test-retest reliability. However, these scores did not correlate with self-reported habitual use of temporal distancing or reappraisal strategies generally. These findings suggest that the ability to use a temporal distancing strategy for emotion regulation improves during adolescence, but that ability may not be related to habitual use of this strategy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

Type: Article
Title: Reliability and validity of a temporal distancing emotion regulation task in adolescence
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1037/emo0000744
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1037/emo0000744
Language: English
Additional information: © 2020 The Author(s). his article has been published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).
Keywords: emotion regulation, temporal distancing, adolescence, reliability, validity
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10094331
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