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Investigation of the evolution of radiation-induced lung damage using serial CT imaging and pulmonary function tests

Correia Veloso Da Veiga, CI; Chandy, E; Jacob, J; Yip, N; Szmul, A; Landau, D; McClelland, J; (2020) Investigation of the evolution of radiation-induced lung damage using serial CT imaging and pulmonary function tests. Radiotherapy and Oncology , 148 pp. 89-96. 10.1016/j.radonc.2020.03.026. Green open access

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Abstract

Background and purpose: Radiation-induced lung damage (RILD) is a common consequence of lung cancer radiotherapy (RT) with unclear evolution over time. We quantify radiological RILD longitudinally and correlate it with dosimetry and respiratory morbidity. Materials and methods: CTs were available pre-RT and at 3, 6, 12 and 24-months post-RT for forty-five subjects enrolled in a phase 1/2 clinical trial of isotoxic, dose-escalated chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen CT-based measures of parenchymal, pleural and lung volume change, and anatomical distortions, were calculated. Respiratory morbidity was assessed with the Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnoea score and spirometric pulmonary function tests (PFTs): FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and DLCO. Results: FEV1, FEV1/FVC and MRC scores progressively declined post-RT; FVC decreased by 6-months before partially recovering. Radiologically, an early phase (3–6 months) of acute inflammation was characterised by reversible parenchymal change and non-progressive anatomical distortion. A phase of chronic scarring followed (6–24 months) with irreversible parenchymal change, progressive volume loss and anatomical distortion. Post-RT increase in contralateral lung volume was common. Normal lung volume shrinkage correlated longitudinally with mean lung dose (r = 0.30–0.40, p = 0.01–0.04). Radiological findings allowed separation of patients with predominant acute versus chronic RILD; subjects with predominantly chronic RILD had poorer pre-RT lung function. Conclusions: CT-based measures enable detailed quantification of the longitudinal evolution of RILD. The majority of patients developed progressive lung damage, even when the early phase was absent or mild. Pre-RT lung function and RT dosimetry may allow to identify subjects at increased risk of RILD.

Type: Article
Title: Investigation of the evolution of radiation-induced lung damage using serial CT imaging and pulmonary function tests
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.radonc.2020.03.026
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2020.03.026
Language: English
Additional information: ©2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V.This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Med Phys and Biomedical Eng
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10094163
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