UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Stemming the tide of resistance in TB: development of chemical tools to evaluate mycothiol dependent enzymes in multidrug resistance in mycobacteria

Rybak, Ewelina; (2020) Stemming the tide of resistance in TB: development of chemical tools to evaluate mycothiol dependent enzymes in multidrug resistance in mycobacteria. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

[thumbnail of Rybak_10093880_Thesis.pdf]
Preview
Text
Rybak_10093880_Thesis.pdf

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that kills more than a million people a year and poses a significant health threat. Because of the global spread of multi-drug resistant TB and high infection rates, there is a significant unmet clinical need for new drugs. M. tuberculosis (Mtb) produces mycothiol (MSH) in place of glutathione as the most abundant low molecular weight thiol. MSH and associated enzymes (e.g. mycothiol-S-transferase, MST) are thought to play pivotal roles in cellular protection against various xenobiotics. Successful synthesis of MST inhibitors may lead to the development of a novel strategy for the treatment of TB. The aim of this project is to validate MST as a novel drug target and understand the role played by MST in mycobacterial physiology via the development of MSH analogues as chemical probes. To achieve this a 2-fold approach was adopted. The first approach includes the development of mycothiol analogues. The synthetic routes towards the synthesis of three different mycothiol analogues containing glucosamine and cysteine moieties are described. These simplified analogues provide a potential scaffold for the synthesis of a library of S-conjugates that would enable us to probe the hydrophobic pocket of MST and gain some information about MST’s structure–activity relationships. The second approach involves the use of kinetic target-guided synthesis (kTGS), a process in which the protein acts as a catalyst or template in the synthesis of its own best inhibitors from the ‘choices’ provided. Towards this goal, two azido and two azidoacetamido derivatives of the simplified mycothiol analogue were successfully synthesised and can act as a handle within the binding site. Moreover, the above-mentioned azides were used to synthesize several triazoles that can be utilised as standards when kTGS is performed. The significance of these findings to future drug discovery efforts in this area is discussed.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Stemming the tide of resistance in TB: development of chemical tools to evaluate mycothiol dependent enzymes in multidrug resistance in mycobacteria
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: © The Author 2020. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms. Access may initially be restricted at the author’s request.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10093880
Downloads since deposit
59Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item