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Associations between maternal BMI, breastfeeding practices and infant anthropometric status in Colombia; secondary analysis of ENSIN 2010

Aldana-Parra, F; Vega, GO; Fewtrell, M; (2020) Associations between maternal BMI, breastfeeding practices and infant anthropometric status in Colombia; secondary analysis of ENSIN 2010. BMC Public Health , 20 , Article 232. 10.1186/s12889-020-8310-z. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND Maternal malnutrition and infant feeding mode impact short and long term infant and child morbidity and mortality. The period of lactation may provide an opportunity to modulate the risk of disease later in life. Our aim was to estimate the effect of maternal body mass index (BMI) and infant feeding mode, particularly breastfeeding practices, on the anthropometric status of children under 2 years in Colombia. METHODS A secondary analysis was performed using the data from ENSIN 2010. Term infants under 2y, singleton, with a mother older than 18y, were included in the analysis. Outcomes were wasting (WLZ < -2SD), overweight (WLZ > +2SD) and stunting (LAZ < -2SD). Predictors were infant feeding (exclusive and predominant BF constructed from 24-h recall, age at introduction of liquids, semisolids and solids) and maternal BMI. Socioeconomic variables, maternal education and age, conditions during pregnancy and birth weight were analyzed as covariates. RESULTS Mothers of overweight infants had higher BMI (Mean dif = 1.47 kg/m2; 95% CI = 2.1, 0.8) than those with normal weight infants. Stunting and wasting were not predicted by maternal anthropometry or infant feeding mode. Fewer maternal years of education were associated with wasting (OR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.86, 0.97; p = 0.003) and stunting (OR = 0.92; 95% CI = 0.89, 0.94; p < 0.0001), while more maternal years of education were associated with overweight (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.02, 1.01; p = 0.001); higher birth weight was associated with overweight (OR = 1.001; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.001; p < 0.0001) and lower birth was associated with stunting (OR = 0.99; 95% CI = 0.89; p < 0.0001) in the final regression model. CONCLUSIONS Maternal BMI is a modifiable target for public health policy to promote healthy infant growth. Infant nutritional status is affected by direct and indirect factors that need to be addressed in further studies.

Type: Article
Title: Associations between maternal BMI, breastfeeding practices and infant anthropometric status in Colombia; secondary analysis of ENSIN 2010
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-020-8310-z
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-8310-z
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Maternal nutritional status, Lactating women, Infant nutritional status, Maternal-infant health, Colombian population, Stunting, Wasting, Maternal overweight, Maternal undernutrition, Children overweight, Breastfeeding, Exclusive breastfeeding
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > Population, Policy and Practice Dept
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10092688
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