UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

A mixed-methods evaluation of stakeholder perspectives on pediatric pneumonia in Nigeria-priorities, challenges, and champions

King, C; Iuliano, A; Burgess, RA; Agwai, I; Ahmar, S; Aranda, Z; Bahiru, S; ... Falade, AG; + view all (2020) A mixed-methods evaluation of stakeholder perspectives on pediatric pneumonia in Nigeria-priorities, challenges, and champions. Pediatric Pulmonology 10.1002/ppul.24607.

[img] Text (Article)
King_StakeholderNigeriaPaper_FINAL.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 28 January 2021.

Download (759kB)
[img] Text (Tables)
King_StakeholdersNigeria_Tables.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 28 January 2021.

Download (424kB)
[img] Text (Supporting information)
King_WebAppendix_R1.pdf - Accepted version
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 28 January 2021.

Download (555kB)

Abstract

Background: Interventions to reduce pneumonia mortality exist; however, stakeholder engagement is needed to prioritize these. We explored diverse stakeholder opinions on current policy challenges and priorities for pediatric pneumonia in Nigeria. / Methods: We conducted a mixed‐methods study, with a web‐survey and semi‐structured interviews, to explore stakeholder roles, policy barriers, opportunities, and priorities. Web‐survey participants were identified through stakeholder mapping, including researchers’ networks, academic and grey literature, and “Every Breath Counts” coalition membership. Stakeholders included actors involved in pediatric pneumonia in Nigeria from non‐governmental, government, academic, civil society, private, and professional organizations. Stakeholder interviews were conducted with local government, healthcare managers, professional associations, and local leaders in Lagos and Jigawa states. Quantitative data were analyzed descriptively; qualitative data were analyzed using a thematic framework. / Results: Of 111 stakeholders, 38 (34%) participated in the web‐survey and 18 stakeholder interviews were conducted. Four thematic areas emerged: current policy, systems barriers, intervention priorities, and champions. Interviewees reported a lack of pneumonia‐specific policies, despite acknowledging guidelines had been adopted in their settings. Barriers to effective pneumonia management were seen at all levels of the system, from the community to healthcare to policy, with key issues of resourcing and infrastructure. Intervention priorities were the strengthening of community knowledge and improving case management, focused on primary care. While stakeholders identified several key actors for pediatric pneumonia, they also highlighted a lack of champions. / Conclusion: Consistent messages emerged to prioritize community and primary care initiatives, alongside improved access to oxygen, and pulse oximetry. There is a need for clear pneumonia policies, and support for adoption at a state level.

Type: Article
Title: A mixed-methods evaluation of stakeholder perspectives on pediatric pneumonia in Nigeria-priorities, challenges, and champions
DOI: 10.1002/ppul.24607
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24607
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: child, Nigeria, pneumonia, political economy, stakeholder
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10091812
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item