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Prominent White Matter Involvement in Multiple System Atrophy of Cerebellar Type

Faber, J; Giordano, I; Jiang, X; Kindler, C; Spottke, A; Acosta-Cabronero, J; Nestor, PJ; ... Klockgether, T; + view all (2020) Prominent White Matter Involvement in Multiple System Atrophy of Cerebellar Type. Movement Disorders 10.1002/mds.27987. Green open access

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Abstract

Background Sporadic degenerative ataxia patients fall into 2 major groups: multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA‐C) and sporadic adult‐onset ataxia (SAOA). Both groups have cerebellar volume loss, but little is known about the differential involvement of gray and white matter in MSA‐C when compared with SAOA. Objectives The objective of this study was to identify structural differences of brain gray and white matter between both patient groups. Methods We used magnetic resonance imaging to acquire T1‐weighted images and diffusion tensor images from 12 MSA‐C patients, 31 SAOA patients, and 55 healthy controls. Magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed with voxel‐based‐morphometry, tract‐based spatial statistics, and tractography‐based regional diffusion tensor images analysis. Results Whole‐brain and cerebellar‐focused voxel‐based‐morphometry analysis showed gray matter volume loss in both patient groups when compared with healthy controls, specifically in the cerebellar areas subserving sensorimotor functions. When compared with controls, the SAOA and MSA‐C patients showed white matter loss in the cerebellum, whereas brainstem white matter was reduced only in the MSA‐C patients. The tract‐based spatial statistics revealed reduced fractional anisotropy within the pons and cerebellum in the MSA‐C patients both in comparison with the SAOA patients and healthy controls. In addition, tractography‐based regional analysis showed reduced fractional anisotropy along the corticospinal tracts in MSA‐C, but not SAOA. Conclusion Although in our cohort extent and distribution of gray and white matter loss were similar between the MSA‐C and SAOA patients, magnetic resonance imaging data showed prominent microstructural white matter involvement in the MSA‐C patients that was not present in the SAOA patients. Our findings highlight the significance of microstructural white matter changes in the differentiation between both conditions. © 2020 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Type: Article
Title: Prominent White Matter Involvement in Multiple System Atrophy of Cerebellar Type
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/mds.27987
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27987
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences & Neurology, diffusion tensor imaging, multiple system atrophy, sporadic ataxia, voxel based morphometry, VOXEL-BASED MORPHOMETRY, BRAIN-STEM, ATAXIA, DEGENERATION, DIAGNOSIS, VALIDATION, HEREDITARY, ETIOLOGY, DISEASE, SCALE
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10091782
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