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Translating pH‐sensitive PROgressive saturation for QUantifying Exchange rates using Saturation Times (PRO‐QUEST) MRI to a 3T clinical scanner

Kim, M; Kujawa, A; Battiston, M; Demetriou, E; Schneider, T; Collorone, S; Tur, C; ... Golay, X; + view all (2020) Translating pH‐sensitive PROgressive saturation for QUantifying Exchange rates using Saturation Times (PRO‐QUEST) MRI to a 3T clinical scanner. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine , 84 (4) pp. 1734-1746. 10.1002/mrm.28229. Green open access

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Abstract

Purpose: To translate the recently developed PRO‐QUEST (Progressive saturation for quantifying exchange rates using saturation times) sequence from preclinical 9.4T to 3T clinical magnetic field strength. Methods: Numerical simulations were performed to define the optimal saturation flip angles for PRO‐QUEST saturation pulses at 3T and demonstrate the effect of a ∆T 2 error on the exchange rate (k ex) estimation at various field strengths. Exchange‐dependent relaxation rate (R ex) was measured for glutamate solutions in various pH, healthy volunteers and patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Additionally, concentration‐independent ratiometric R ex maps were produced to evaluate regional signal variations across the brain of human volunteers. Results: The calculated R ex significantly correlates with pH in glutamate samples, however, k ex values are underestimated as compared to those previously obtained at 9.4T. In the ratiometric R ex map of healthy volunteers, no significant differences are found between grey matter, white matter, and basal ganglia. In patients with MS, white matter lesions are visible in single saturation power R ex maps whereas only a periventricular lesion is apparent in the ratiometric R ex map. Conclusion: We demonstrate that quantification of pH sensitive indices using PRO‐QUEST is feasible at 3T within clinically acceptable acquisition times. Our initial findings in patients with MS show that pH sensitive indices varied with the type of lesion examined whereas no significant difference was found in healthy volunteers between tissue types, suggesting that it would be worthwhile to apply PRO‐QUEST in a larger cohort of patients to better understand its distinct imaging features relative to conventional techniques.

Type: Article
Title: Translating pH‐sensitive PROgressive saturation for QUantifying Exchange rates using Saturation Times (PRO‐QUEST) MRI to a 3T clinical scanner
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/mrm.28229
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/mrm.28229
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Neuroinflammation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Department of Imaging
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Chemical Engineering
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Computer Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090941
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