UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Comparison between self-administered depression questionnaires and patients' own views of changes in their mood: a prospective cohort study in primary care

Hobbs, C; Lewis, G; Dowrick, C; Kounali, D; Peters, TJ; Lewis, G; (2020) Comparison between self-administered depression questionnaires and patients' own views of changes in their mood: a prospective cohort study in primary care. Psychological Medicine 10.1017/S0033291719003878. (In press). Green open access

[thumbnail of comparison_between_selfadministered_depression_questionnaires_and_patients_own_views_of_changes_in_their_mood_a_prospective_cohort_study_in_primary_care.pdf]
Preview
Text
comparison_between_selfadministered_depression_questionnaires_and_patients_own_views_of_changes_in_their_mood_a_prospective_cohort_study_in_primary_care.pdf - Published Version

Download (187kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND Self-administered questionnaires are widely used in primary care and other clinical settings to assess the severity of depressive symptoms and monitor treatment outcomes. Qualitative studies have found that changes in questionnaire scores might not fully capture patients' experience of changes in their mood but there are no quantitative studies of this issue. We examined the extent to which changes in scores from depression questionnaires disagreed with primary care patients' perceptions of changes in their mood and investigated factors influencing this relationship. METHODS Prospective cohort study assessing patients on four occasions, 2 weeks apart. Patients (N = 554) were recruited from primary care surgeries in three UK sites (Bristol, Liverpool and York) and had reported depressive symptoms or low mood in the past year [68% female, mean age 48.3 (s.d. 12.6)]. Main outcome measures were changes in scores on patient health questionnaire (PHQ-9) and beck depression inventory (BDI-II) and the patients' own ratings of change. RESULTS There was marked disagreement between clinically important changes in questionnaire scores and patient-rated change, with disagreement of 51% (95% CI 46–55%) on PHQ-9 and 55% (95% CI 51–60%) on BDI-II. Patients with more severe anxiety were less likely, and those with better mental and physical health-related quality of life were more likely, to report feeling better, having controlled for depression scores. CONCLUSIONS Our results illustrate the limitations of self-reported depression scales to assess clinical change. Clinicians should be cautious in interpreting changes in questionnaire scores without further clinical assessment.

Type: Article
Title: Comparison between self-administered depression questionnaires and patients' own views of changes in their mood: a prospective cohort study in primary care
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291719003878
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291719003878
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Keywords: Depression, epidemiology, primary care
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090653
Downloads since deposit
45Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item