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Change in device-measured physical activity assessed in childhood and adolescence in relation to depressive symptoms: a general population-based cohort study

Hamer, M; Patalay, P; Bell, S; Batty, GD; (2020) Change in device-measured physical activity assessed in childhood and adolescence in relation to depressive symptoms: a general population-based cohort study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 10.1136/jech-2019-213399. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

AIM: Evidence for a link between physical activity and mental health in young people is hampered by methodological shortcomings. Using repeat assessments of device-measured physical activity, we examined the association of within-individual variation in free-living activity over 7 years with depressive symptoms. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of a nationally representative sample of children born in the UK (n=4898). Physical activity was quantified using accelerometry at ages 7 and 14. The main outcome was depressive symptoms, based on the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire, assessed at age 14. RESULTS: After adjustment for socioeconomic status, body mass index and psychological problems at baseline, a higher level of light-intensity activity at age 7 in girls was associated with a lower likelihood of having depressive symptoms at follow-up (OR, 0.79; 95% CI 0.61 to 1.00), although no associations were observed for moderate to vigorous activity or sedentary behaviour. Girls who transitioned from low baseline activity to higher levels at follow-up experienced a lower risk of depressive symptoms (OR, 0.60; 95% CI 0.39 to 0.92) compared with the inactive reference category. Null associations were observed in boys. Participants who consistently met the current recommendation of 60 min/day of moderate to vigorous activity both at 7 and 14 years of age experienced the lowest risk of depressive symptoms (OR, 0.55; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.88). CONCLUSION: To prevent depressive symptoms in adolescence, policies to increase physical activity from mid-childhood may have utility.

Type: Article
Title: Change in device-measured physical activity assessed in childhood and adolescence in relation to depressive symptoms: a general population-based cohort study
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1136/jech-2019-213399
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-213399
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Surgery and Interventional Sci
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular Science > Population Science and Experimental Medicine > MRC Unit for Lifelong Hlth and Ageing
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090425
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