UCL Discovery
UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Organised crime and repeat victimisation: Modelling victimisation patterns against Mexican businesses

Estévez Soto, Patricio Rodrigo; (2020) Organised crime and repeat victimisation: Modelling victimisation patterns against Mexican businesses. Doctoral thesis (Ph.D), UCL (University College London). Green open access

[thumbnail of EstevezSotoPR_PhD_thesis_final.pdf]
Preview
Text
EstevezSotoPR_PhD_thesis_final.pdf - Accepted version

Download (3MB) | Preview

Abstract

Research consistently shows that crime concentrates on a few repeatedly victimised places and targets. However, such research has been mainly concerned with 'traditional' crimes against individuals and households and has paid little attention to the victimisation patterns of organised crimes. As such, it is not clear whether organised crimes exhibit concentration patterns consistent with repeat victimisation, nor whether the mechanisms that explain concentration in 'traditional' crimes also explain the concentration of organised crimes. This thesis is concerned with the victimisation patterns of extortion against businesses, a quintessential organised crime activity. While the extortion phenomenon is often understood as an institutionalised practice of extra-legal territorial control exerted by organised criminal groups, this thesis approaches extortion predominantly from a situational perspective, focusing on the incidents that constitute the extortion phenomenon. Ultimately, the goal is to identify the incident-, victim-, and area-level characteristics that affect the patterns of extortion victimisation. To achieve this, it relies on secondary analysis of Mexico's National Commercial Victimisation Survey 2014, one of the largest business victimisation surveys in the world. The thesis uses quantitative modelling to answer four research questions: is extortion concentrated beyond what is expected by chance? What could explain repeat extortion victimisation patterns? What are the predictors of compliance with extortion demands? And, do patterns and mechanisms of repeat victimisation vary according to the type of extortion suffered? The findings suggest that incident-, and victim-level measures are more relevant than area-level characteristics to understand extortion victimisation patterns. Furthermore, the findings suggest that event dependence is a stronger predictor of extortion concentration than risk heterogeneity. Lastly, the thesis discusses the implications of the findings for academia, crime statistics, and crime prevention policy.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Qualification: Ph.D
Title: Organised crime and repeat victimisation: Modelling victimisation patterns against Mexican businesses
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © The Author 2020. Original content in this thesis is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) Licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Any third-party copyright material present remains the property of its respective owner(s) and is licensed under its existing terms.
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Security and Crime Science
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10090180
Downloads since deposit
352Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item