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Searching for active ingredients in rehabilitation: applying the taxonomy of behaviour change techniques to a conversation therapy for aphasia

Johnson, F; Beeke, S; Best, W; (2019) Searching for active ingredients in rehabilitation: applying the taxonomy of behaviour change techniques to a conversation therapy for aphasia. Disability and Rehabilitation 10.1080/09638288.2019.1703147. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

PURPOSE: A taxonomy of behaviour change techniques has been developed to help specify the active ingredients of behaviour change interventions. Its potential for rehabilitation research is significant, however, reliable use among allied health professionals has not yet been explored. This article describes the content of a conversation therapy for post-stroke aphasia using the taxonomy and investigates inter-rater reliability among Speech and Language Therapists. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Two Speech and Language Therapists undertook the same half day, self-led training programme in the behaviour change technique taxonomy and independently coded all materials in the “Better Conversations with Aphasia” programme. Inter-rater reliability was evaluated using the kappa coefficient and percentage agreement. Reliably agreed techniques were categorised according to the speaker and type of behaviour they targeted. RESULTS: Sixteen behaviour change techniques were reliably agreed to be present. Inter-rater reliability was moderate (K = 0.465), and in line with satisfactory percentage agreement (79.8%). More techniques were used to target the adoption of new behaviours (15) than the termination of old ones (3). People with aphasia received fewer behaviour change techniques (10) than their communication partners (16). CONCLUSIONS: Describing the content of conversation therapy with the taxonomy of behaviour change techniques offers clinically useful insights with potential to enhance both research and practice. The intervention is shown to target different types of behaviour in different ways, and offer different speaker groups different content. Non-psychologist users of the taxonomy may encounter challenges working with unfamiliar concepts and terminology, which may impact on reliable use.

Type: Article
Title: Searching for active ingredients in rehabilitation: applying the taxonomy of behaviour change techniques to a conversation therapy for aphasia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/09638288.2019.1703147
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2019.1703147
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Behaviour change technique taxonomy, reliability, rehabilitation, aphasia, conversation therapy
UCL classification: UCL
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: https://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10089408
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